Organizational Leadership (ORLD)

ORLD 6200 Ethics and Leadership — 3 credits

This foundation course for the MAOL program fosters personal development as an ethical, effective and enduring leader. Course activities include: analyzing feedback from assessment instruments such as the Leadership Practices Inventory, reflecting on personal leadership experiences and those of others, considering case studies, and readings on ethics and leadership. Major assignments include analyzing data collected from interviews with leaders, writing a series of papers on effective, ethical, and enduring leadership, participating in a team presentation dealing with ethical challenges in organizations, creating a personal leadership credo and metaphor and producing a final portfolio documenting your leadership abilities, experiences and goals. Note: ORLD 6200 is to be taken as the first course. D2L technology is introduced in this course. Required: Purchase of Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) and one other assessment TBA.
Prerequisite: Admission to MAOL.

ORLD 6250 Organizations: Social And Political Structures — 3 credits

This course examines the theory around organizational functioning: how they are structured, how they behave, and how they can be developed. It examines the relationship of four frames of thinking about and viewing organization phenomena: structural, human resource, political and symbolic perspectives. The case is made that no one frame is robust enough to sufficiently explain organizational events, and more importantly, to effectively assist in creating and implementing desired change. Students are asked to grapple with the idea of reframing and understanding the implications this has for the idea that there is only one correct version of any event. The course will focus primarily on the systems or organizational level of behavior, rather than the individual or interpersonal levels. Thinking about "how you think about" organizations will be a continuing theme throughout. A wide range of ideas, thoughts and theories about organizations will be covered. The reasons for this are many, but a principal one is to expose learners to a diversity of concepts and variables that are generally recognized as important considerations for understanding organizational action and dynamics. None of the readings will "tell you what to do" in real life and in some cases they will contradict each other. What is important about the readings and ideas presented is that they can provide students with sets of concepts about factors, relationships, and issues that are vital to consider in trying to understand what is going on in an organization and what the organization is all about. In other words, they can provide conceptual clues for where and what to look for in diagnosing, working with, and working in organizations. Exactly what to do, evaluating the importance of different factors in a specific situation and reconciling competing concepts/explanations is ultimately left to a leadership judgment call based on the information and understanding available, and the leader's sense of ethics, a discussion of which occurs toward the end of the course. The fundamental intention of this course is to improve those judgment calls by providing students with a variety of conceptual tools to increase their ability to look for, recognize, and process information and data about organizations. This course is offered bi-annually.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6300 Strategic Communication — 3 credits

This course is a laboratory for written and oral communication activities based on an issue chosen by each student. Assignments throughout the term are designed to simulate the typical process of advocating for change. Recognizing communicator choices vis-à-vis different stakeholders, and then targeting messages effectively toward designated audiences, constitutes the major learning goal. Activities include profiling relevant audiences, searching for data, interviewing stakeholders and decision-makers, preparing fact-finding reports and action plans, producing graphics and working in coaching teams. Oral presentations are digitally recorded. Oral and written assignments are revised based on feedback. Throughout, emphasis is placed on being both an effective and ethical communicator. Note: It is recommended that ORLD 6300 be taken as one of the first four courses. A data-searching lab and use of PowerPoint are part of this course.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6400 Accounting and Finance Skills for Effective Decision Making — 3 credits

This course is designed to provide professionals and non-financial managers with the ability to interpret and use accounting and financial data in organizational planning and decision-making. The course explores accounting information compilation and analysis to examine and measure organizational financial health. Operational and capital budgets will be prepared and analyzed and financial strategies implemented to improve operational performance and strategic decision making. Note: No prior accounting course work or experience is required. Microsoft Excel workshop strongly recommended. Visit the Helpdesk site for tutorials. This course is offered in J-Term and Summer Session.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6500 Innovative Leadership — 3 credits

Entrepreneurs and innovators tend to be thought of as ‘outliers’ from larger organizations, as people who start businesses and are not afraid to take risks. This course explores the importance of being an innovative leader, and how leaders can think and make decisions as entrepreneurs, no matter what size their organizations. The course investigates what motivates entrepreneurs, how they operate, and what measures success for entrepreneurs across industries. It considers business entrepreneurs, solo, social and serial entrepreneurs, and the nature of global entrepreneurship. Course activities include dialogue with practicing entrepreneurs, field trips to their places of business, analysis of case studies and business plans, and self- assessment of innovative and entrepreneurial traits to determine students’ strengths and opportunities for development as innovative leaders. Students will evaluate how they can incorporate entrepreneurial and innovative thinking into their own leadership by building an innovative vision, creating innovative teams and driving innovative cultures to stay on the cutting edge.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6600 Research and Analytical Skills for Decision Making — 3 credits

Students study the research methods and skills necessary for effective leadership in generating change. The course focuses on providing students with the ability to conduct and evaluate various types of research. The content of the course concentrates on defining research questions, identifying information sources and selecting appropriate quantitative and qualitative research methods. In addition, students analyze and interpret data using both descriptive and inferential statistical concepts. This course offers students the opportunity to review the statistical principles used to establish findings and evaluate research results. Note: Microsoft Excel, Word and PowerPoint technologies are used.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6650 Leading Nonprofit Organizations — 3 credits

In this course, we will research and analyze best practices in leading nonprofit organizations. Based on the premise that nonprofit leaders are mission driven, we will start by considering the role and function of nonprofits in today's society. Through readings, speakers and class discussions, we will develop a critical understanding of the major areas that nonprofit leaders are responsible for leading and overseeing: governance, strategic planning and thinking, program development, human resources, marketing and communication, obtaining and managing financial resources. A key learning strategy for this course will involve working on "live" projects tied to leading nonprofit organizations. Students will work in consulting teams to understand nonprofit leadership issues, and research, evaluate and design programs/processes to address substantive organizational needs. These consulting team projects will relate to the topics covered in the class and add value to an organization. The projects will culminate in presentations to the leaders of the nonprofit for which they were done in order to advance the work of the organization and increase its overall effectiveness.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6683 Directed Study — 3 credits

Directed Study is limited to a student whose unusual circumstances prohibit the taking of a regularly scheduled course, but who needs the material of that course to satisfy a requirement. The learning experience depends on faculty availability and is restricted to certain courses. Students are limited to one Directed Study in the MAOL.
Prerequisites: Faculty member advising, Program Director and Dean approval. The online form to register for a directed study is available on the Office of the Registrar website.

ORLD 6700 The Cultural Context of Leadership — 3 credits

This course challenges students to engage in transformational learning aimed at critical evaluation and deep understanding of successful leadership in specific cultural context. The course involves study and reflection, and a structured group study-abroad experience. We will compare and contrast leadership theory and experience in the U.S., a well-established multi-ethnic democracy with leadership theory and practice in cultural context in other developed or developing nations. The overall focus of this course is to explore the economic, sociological, political, and historical setting for leadership, with particular attention to cultural complexities shaping leadership practice.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200 and completion of six additional credits.

ORLD 6720 Values-led Leadership — 3 credits

This course looks at how we define success and challenges participants to think beyond their assumptions and paradigms. We will expand our thinking on what is possible when leaders align their deepest values with their actions. At the heart of this course is transformational leadership; transforming self to help transform organizations into a way of being that impacts the world for good. We will unpack how success is defined and explore how companies that commit to creating a sustainable profit AND a strong purpose (beyond making money) are excelling and raising the bar on organizational success. The course integrates emotional intelligence, spirituality and action learning, as well as other research based work. Insights will be drawn from the fields of spirituality, theology, philosophy, management and leadership studies. Additional costs may apply. Note: This course is offered bi-annually in J-Term.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6730 Work, Meaning and Purpose — 3 credits

This course is an exploration of the relationship between work, meaning and purpose. The students will use their own work experiences in conversation with readings, lectures, and discussions. Meaning, purpose and spirituality are closely linked: and this class will provide the opportunity to learn about a variety of paths and practices. We will explore the role of work in spiritual formation and its function in generating meaning in our lives. The questions of vocation, calling and discernment of purposeful life work will also be engaged to help the students grow in their capacity to integrate their spiritual life and work. Students will identify their beliefs, values, and practices that support ongoing transformation within their personal and professional lives. Additional costs may apply. Note: This course is offered bi-annually in J-Term.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6750 Leading Teams and Projects: Tools and Skills — 3 credits

This course provides a practical approach to teams. Areas of focus include team leadership, team tasks, group dynamics, team processes and the use of self. The course has an experiential component. Team models are introduced and teams are studied in three ways: outside of the classroom, in project teams and in the class as a whole. Learning outcomes include leading responsibly, acting with confidence and communicating effectively. Other outcomes include the ability to work collaboratively and to assess personal and group styles.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6800 Inclusive Leadership: Leading Effectively across Differences — 3 credits

This course gives students the theoretical and practical knowledge they need to lead more effectively across multiple dimensions of difference such as race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. Students will examine how their own experiences shape their ability to effectively lead diverse teams and discuss strategies to develop diversity leadership competency and more inclusive work environments. Students will also consider diversity at the organizational and community levels, exploring the business case for diversity and inclusion initiatives, as well as how organizations can identify and address disparities that exist both internally and within their local communities. Note: This course is offered in J-Term.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 6951 Independent Study — 1 credit

Independent study offers a student the opportunity for specialized research not covered in a course offering, by the action project or thesis. A student works with a faculty advisor to develop a learning contract, which specifies the content and objectives of the study as well as the requirements and procedures for evaluation. The amount of credit to be earned for the study also is included in the learning contract. Students are limited to one Independent Study. (1 credit = 40 hours of work; 2 credits = 80 hours of work; 3 credits = 120 hours of work). Prerequisite: ORLD 6200 and approval of the faculty member advising and Program Director. The online form for registering for an Independent Study is available on the Office of the Registrar website.

ORLD 6952 Independent Study — 2 credits

Independent study offers a student the opportunity for specialized research not covered in a course offering, by the action project or thesis. A student works with a faculty advisor to develop a learning contract, which specifies the content and objectives of the study as well as the requirements and procedures for evaluation. The amount of credit to be earned for the study also is included in the learning contract. Students are limited to one Independent Study. (1 credit = 40 hours of work; 2 credits = 80 hours of work; 3 credits = 120 hours of work). Prerequisite: ORLD 6200 and approval of the faculty member advising and Program Director. The online form for registering for an Independent Study is available on the Office of the Registrar website.

ORLD 6953 Independent Study — 3 credits

Independent study offers a student the opportunity for specialized research not covered in a course offering, by the action project or thesis. A student works with a faculty advisor to develop a learning contract, which specifies the content and objectives of the study as well as the requirements and procedures for evaluation. The amount of credit to be earned for the study also is included in the learning contract. Students are limited to one Independent Study. (1 credit = 40 hours of work; 2 credits = 80 hours of work; 3 credits = 120 hours of work). Prerequisite: ORLD 6200 and approval of the faculty member advising and Program Director. The online form for registering for an Independent Study is available on the Office of the Registrar website.

ORLD 6993 Topics — 3 credits

Topics vary from term to term. See the online course schedule for course descriptions.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7070 Leadership in the Public Forum — 3 credits

This intensive course will engage students in the exploration of leadership and power in the public forum. It will provide students with a better understanding of their own and their organizations' role in engaging in government processes and influencing public policy. Through the use of current events and historical review, students will analyze options and examine ways in which they can engage in the process and foster systemic change. They will learn how to take advantage of the opportunities and benefits of civic engagement. This will be a highly experiential/interactive class – composed of guest speakers, student and multimedia presentations, interactive activities and class discussions. The instructor is a former state legislator and coursework includes a personal interview, a book review, and a final individual student presentation of a Public Policy Project. One class session will take place in the State Capitol. Note: This course is taught in J-Term.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7200 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Leadership — 3 credits

This intensive course is designed for students who wish to develop a comprehensive understanding of leadership and culture and how they influence the functioning of cross-cultural groups and major institutions today. In three weekends, we will clarify these concepts and consider how they can be applied to real world situations. To achieve this goal, the course will use concepts drawn from several academic disciplines and cultural contexts. We will distinguish “leadership” from “management” and focus on distinctions between “leadership” and “functioning of organizations” ranging from simple to complex. Students will be expected to integrate these concepts and learn how to translate them from theory to practice. This course is not a traditional leadership training program, but an academic course designed to produce knowledge and understanding of leadership, organizations and culture. This class will employ a variety of instructional approaches including lectures, critical incidents, case studies, large-group and small-group discussions, a simulation, and problem solving exercises. Note: This course is offered summer session.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7400 Marketing Strategically — 3 credits

Strategic marketing management requires the integration of plans and processes across all functions of the organization guided by customer/consumer focus (marketing concept) and market orientation. The process involves addressing critical questions: • What business are we in (or considering)? • Is the opportunity real? • Who are the customers? • What are their needs (what do they value)? • How good are we at developing and delivering unique value propositions? • Who are our competitors? • How can we organize and design processes to develop and deliver value to our customers/consumers better than our competitors? • How do we achieve successfully implementing the marketing strategy? • Does the financial return justify the investment?
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7410 Health Policy and Ethics — 3 credits

This course examines United States and Minnesota approaches to delivering and paying for health care and includes comparative analyses. Our study is grounded in a discussion of the nature of health and the role of health care in human flourishing; our individual and collective expectations of health care; ethical tensions inherent in the ways we deliver and pay for care; and how the United States differs from other countries. This is a survey and current events course, examining many aspects of United States and Minnesota public policies regarding health care. Note: This course is offered bi-annually.
Prerequisites: ORLD 6200 and six additional credits.

ORLD 7450 Strategic Finance — 3 credits

This course develops a student’s knowledge and application of financial principles to both for profit and not for profit organizations. It is essential for leaders within an organization to understand the role that finance plays in carrying out the organization’s role and mission and the linkage between the strategy of a company and its financial management and performance. The course covers the following subjects: evaluation of financial performance, financial planning, sources or capital, capital structure and credit analysis, cost of capital and corporate valuation. This course is designed to provide a leader the necessary financial tools in order to plan, finance, evaluate and financially manage an organization. Students will gain an understanding of key finance concepts and issues, understand the linkages between finance and strategy and develop proficiency in fundamental finance calculations. Note: Microsoft Excel, Word and PowerPoint technologies are used.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6400.

ORLD 7480 International Trade and the Global Economy — 3 credits

This course promotes discussion about the relationships between local and global concerns with regard to international economic policies and dynamics, as well as providing an integrated treatment of international economic theory, policy and institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), World Trade Organization (WTO) and others. Emphasis is given to the role governments (United States and others) play in their efforts to regulate, restrict, promote or otherwise influence international economics and politics. A basic understanding of theories of international trade and economic development not only helps explain the actions already taken by government officials, it also provides insight into what they plan to do. Ethical issues involved in decision-making in the conduct of international business receive particular attention throughout the course.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7490 Power and Leadership — 3 credits

“The first job of any manager is to get enough power to do their job, and how to do that is not in any job description.” --Leonard Hirsch, Ph.D. True leadership involves the wise use of power, especially for those who find themselves occupying positional leadership roles. However, often little attention is paid to helping managers and leaders develop an ethical, reflective and effective stance concerning their own and others’ use of power. This course helps participants understand sources and applications of their personal power, as well as how it appears within organizations as systems. Personal power is explored as a developmental scheme, with men and women culturally having differing strengths and weaknesses as they move through the stages. A case is made that each gender needs to develop the strengths of the opposite gender’s stereotypical approach to power to be able to become transformational leaders. Reflective, scholarly and skill-based learning is included to help participants master this. Power as experienced within other cultures is also explored. Power within organizations is discussed as political power, and participants are encouraged to develop a level of expertise in navigating and creating change in terms of issues about which they care using organizational political power in an ethical manner.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7500 Leading Organizational Change — 3 credits

This course focuses on leading and facilitating organizational change processes in the context of a highly competitive and evolving global economy. Through action research, systems theory and other models, participants learn about and apply change processes to organizations. Subject areas include the five disciplines of learning organizations, the types of leadership required, the topics of empowerment and employee involvement and various models for change.
Prerequisite: ORLD 6200.

ORLD 7600 Professional and Organizational Ethics — 3 credits

In this course, students consider ethical issues, and investigate ethical theories, the role and utility of codes of ethics in various settings, and the strategic application of ethical decision-making tools to organizational problems. A range of leadership theories are also explored in the context of professional and organizational ethics, and students will develop their own “ethical leadership point of view” by the end of the course. Attention is given throughout the course to strengthening personal moral courage and making judicious choices about why, when, how and with whom to address ethical challenges. Students assess their own ethical systems and the ethical climate of their organizations/professions. Students conduct team and individual analyses of ethical problems. Note: It is recommended that students take this course about halfway through their degree program as the bridge between the leadership core begun in ORLD 6200 and completed in ORLD 8800 Leadership Seminar.
Prerequisite: Completion of 18 credits.

ORLD 7601 Internship/Practicum — 1 credit

The objective of the Practicum is to develop effective leadership skills via hands-on application in the workplace. The Practicum learning contract specifies learning and workplace objectives based on application of curriculum concepts. Students can choose “stretch” projects in their current workplace or explore an alternative work environment. A practicum is supervised by a faculty member and a site supervisor and may be paid or unpaid. Work schedule and format are flexible and may be self-scheduled. Approval of the MAOL Program Director is required to initiate a Practicum. Students are encouraged to register early for the Practicum option. Academic credit is received for this course. (1 credit = 40 hours of work; 2 credits = 80 hours of work; 3 credits = 120 hours of work).
Prerequisites: ORLD 6200 and approval of the learning contract by the site supervisor and the faculty member advising the project.

ORLD 7602 Internship/Practicum — 2 credits

The objective of the Practicum is to develop effective leadership skills via hands-on application in the workplace. The Practicum learning contract specifies learning and workplace objectives based on application of curriculum concepts. Students can choose “stretch” projects in their current workplace or explore an alternative work environment. A practicum is supervised by a faculty member and a site supervisor and may be paid or unpaid. Work schedule and format are flexible and may be self-scheduled. Approval of the MAOL Program Director is required to initiate a Practicum. Students are encouraged to register early for the Practicum option. Academic credit is received for this course. (1 credit = 40 hours of work; 2 credits = 80 hours of work; 3 credits = 120 hours of work).
Prerequisites: ORLD 6200 and approval of the learning contract by the site supervisor and the faculty member advising the project.

ORLD 7603 Internship/Practicum — 3 credits

The objective of the Practicum is to develop effective leadership skills via hands-on application in the workplace. The Practicum learning contract specifies learning and workplace objectives based on application of curriculum concepts. Students can choose “stretch” projects in their current workplace or explore an alternative work environment. A practicum is supervised by a faculty member and a site supervisor and may be paid or unpaid. Work schedule and format are flexible and may be self-scheduled. Approval of the MAOL Program Director is required to initiate a Practicum. Students are encouraged to register early for the Practicum option. Academic credit is received for this course. (1 credit = 40 hours of work; 2 credits = 80 hours of work; 3 credits = 120 hours of work).
Prerequisites: ORLD 6200 and approval of the learning contract by the site supervisor and the faculty member advising the project.

ORLD 7983 Topics — 3 credits

This course combines the work completed in the Leadership Institute seminars, "Leaders of the New Millennium," with academic assignments. Through in-depth research and analysis students explore a relevant leadership topic that applies to organizational leadership and their own personal and professional development. Leaders of the New Millennium begins with an intensive two-day session followed by six monthly four-hour classes. Using the Refirement® model, assessment tools and instructor advising, students develop their individual strategic leadership action plan with measurable outcome-based personal and professional goals. To complete the course students must attend the two-day intensive session and classes, complete the monthly readings and homework assignments, write a critique on a leadership book chosen by the instructor and submit a research paper. The work is advised and evaluated by a MAOL faculty member. Note: This is an eight-month Leadership Institute program with a graduate credit option. Students must first sign up for the Leadership Institute program (receive an enrollment form by contacting leadership@stkate.edu or calling 651-690-6819).

ORLD 7993 Peace Corps Fellow Credit for Academically Relevant Learning — 3 credits

The CARL program provides an opportunity for students to earn credit for prior learning experiences that took place outside of the classroom. Coverdell Fellows develop a portfolio that describes and documents their Peace Corps experience. The experience, reflection and portfolio should capture key learnings in a manner that is the equivalent of a graduate-level course and directly relevant to the MAOL program. The Coverdell Fellow submits the proposal within 30 days of the start of her/his first term enrolled in the MAOL program. A faculty advisor assesses the portfolio for “S/U” grading only. A “Satisfactory” evaluation will result in graduate credits which will be recorded as CARL credits on the student's transcript. The number of credits available differs by concentration.
Prerequisites: MAOL Program Director and Dean of Graduate College approval.

ORLD 7996 Peace Corps Fellow Credit for Academically Relevant Learning — 6 credits

The CARL program provides an opportunity for students to earn credit for prior learning experiences that took place outside of the classroom. Coverdell Fellows develop a portfolio that describes and documents their Peace Corps experience. The experience, reflection and portfolio should capture key learnings in a manner that is the equivalent of a graduate-level course and directly relevant to the MAOL program. The Coverdell Fellow submits the proposal within 30 days of the start of her/his first term enrolled in the MAOL program. A faculty advisor assesses the portfolio for “S/U” grading only. A “Satisfactory” evaluation will result in graduate credits which will be recorded as CARL credits on the student's transcript. The number of credits available differs by concentration.
Prerequisites: MAOL Program Director and Dean of Graduate College approval.

ORLD 8200 Strategic Management — 3 credits

The purpose of this course is to provide students with both a theoretical foundation and hands-on practice in analyzing, formulating and implementing organizational strategy. The course develops students' capacity to both think strategically and act tactically. The course revolves around students working individually, in pairs and in small groups to analyze complex written cases. The cases describe strategic situations of business and non-profit organizations operating in today’s highly competitive, rapidly changing, increasingly diverse, global context and e-connected environment. Microsoft Excel, Word and PowerPoint technologies are used. Note: It is recommended that students complete ORLD 7500.
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 credits.

ORLD 8800 Leadership Seminar — 1 credit

This final course in the MAOL program serves as the culminating classroom experience for MAOL students. ORLD 8800 is designed to integrate learning across all MAOL courses and experiences, to promote critical thinking about major leadership issues, and to reflect on and celebrate each student's accomplishments. We will also share our research together, as students progress toward completion and presentation of their MAOL action research project or thesis. Course activities include: review of all of the student's papers and projects from the MAOL program; re-taking the LPI (Leadership Practices Inventory); reflection on and analysis of the student's personal leadership learning and experience through writing and discussion; sharing and informal presentation of the student's action project/thesis research, and group planning and execution of a celebration and acknowledgement ceremony at the end of the course. Major assignments include creation of a final leadership portfolio and team seminar presentations on specific leadership issues to be selected by the class.
Prerequisites: ORLD 8901 or ORLD 8902 and completion of 30 additional credits. Required: Purchase of LPI online.

ORLD 8880 Leadership Seminar — 3 credits

This final course in the MAOL program serves as the culminating classroom experience for MAOL students. ORLD 8880 is designed to integrate learning across all MAOL courses and experiences, to promote critical thinking about major leadership issues, and to reflect on and celebrate accomplishments. Activities supporting these outcomes include: review of all papers and projects written during each student’s MAOL program; re-taking of the LPI assessment; formal reflection and analysis of personal leadership learning and experience through a series of focused essays; planning and execution of a celebration and acknowledgement ceremony as part of the learning process. Major assignments include: creation of a final leadership portfolio through four specific essays and compilation of MAOL documentation; and team seminar presentations about specific leadership issues selected by the class. Prerequisites: ORLD 8901 or 8902, completion of 30 credits. Required: Purchase of LPI online.

ORLD 8901 Action Project Research Proposal — 3 credits

The outcome of this course is a completed research proposal approved by the project advisor, the ORLD 8901 instructor and the MAOL Program Director. During the course students identify their topic and work with the instructor, other students, and their assigned research advisor to develop and test ideas, as well as receive feedback on drafts of their work. Other activities include reading methods texts and completed MAOL action project papers; attending presentations by those completing their program; and meeting with the instructor and proposed advisor. Students are assessed on their abilities to synthesize materials, develop a feasible research design, complete a persuasive and logical research proposal using MAOL guidelines, develop a partnership with an advisor, coach others on their research ideas, and integrate leadership and ethics into the research approach. S/U grading. Students must register for ORLD 8980 the following semester. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 credits and departmental spproval (contact Valerie Krech at vakrech@stkate.edu). Note: Because of the credits and the extensive use of D2L technology, the course is comprised of six required sessions, as well as individual meetings with the advisor. Consult the syllabus for dates.

ORLD 8902 Thesis Research Proposal — 3 credits

The outcome of this course is a completed research proposal approved by the thesis advisor, the ORLD 8902 instructor and the MAOL Program Director. During the course students identify their topic and work with the instructor, other students, and their assigned research advisor to develop and test ideas, as well as receive feedback on drafts of their work. Other activities include reading methods texts and completed MAOL theses papers; attending presentations by those completing their program; and meeting with the instructor and proposed advisor. Students are assessed on their abilities to synthesize materials, develop a feasible research design, complete a persuasive and logical research proposal using MAOL guidelines, develop a partnership with an advisor, coach others on their research ideas, and integrate leadership and ethics into the research approach. S/U grading. Students must register for ORLD 8990 the following semester. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 credits and departmental spproval (contact Valerie Krech at vakrech@stkate.edu). Additional thesis approval form required for ORLD 8902 found in the handbook. Note: Because of the credits and the extensive use of D2L technology, the course is comprised of six required sessions, as well as individual meetings with the advisor. Consult the syllabus for dates.

ORLD 8980 Leadership Action Project — 2 credits

In the Leadership Action Project, students conduct and reflect on action research about a leadership topic or issue of their choosing. The project can be completed by an individual or team and presented as written work or through another medium. Project results are submitted to the advisor, presented publicly, and written into a formal academic report of findings. The project is assessed by how well it demonstrates the student's ability to collect, analyze and interpret data about a significant leadership topic, as well as the overall quality of the written work. The public presentation is assessed as to how well it demonstrates the student's ability to present the findings effectively and persuasively. Mandatory three session research workshops accompany independent research. Contact the MAOL office to register.
Prerequisites: Departmental approval based on completion of 30 credits with a GPA of 3.0 or better and completion of ORLD 8901, including submission of the approved proposal to the MAOL office.

ORLD 8990 Leadership Thesis — 3 credits

In the Leadership Thesis, students analyze a leadership issue in depth and conduct original research. An individual or team can write the thesis. The research results are written into a formal academic report, defended in front of the thesis committee and publicly presented. The thesis is assessed by how well it demonstrates the student's ability to collect, analyze and interpret data about a significant leadership topic, as well as the overall quality of the written work. The defense and public presentation are assessed as to how well they demonstrate the student's ability to present the findings effectively and persuasively. Mandatory three session research workshops accompany independent research. Contact the MAOL office to register.
Prerequisites: Departmental approval based on completion of 30 credits with a GPA of 3.8 or better and completion of ORLD 8902, including submission of the signed proposal to the MAOL office.