Student Code of Conduct and Community Expectations

Approved by:  Office of Student Affairs

History:  Revised: June 2014 | Revised: August 2017

Related PoliciesAlcohol and Other Drugs | Complaints and Grievance Processes

Related Forms, Procedures and References:

For Questions Contact:  Office of Student Affairs | 651.690.6778 | studentaffairs@stkate.edu

Index:  Statement of Philosophy | Community Expectations | Definitions | Code of Conduct |Sanctions | Hearing Officers | Judicial Procedures | Hearing Procedures | Standards for Resolution | Notification of the Hearing Outcome | Procedure for Appeal of Decisions | Procedures for Resolving Issues of Academic Integrity | Executive Authority | Disciplinary Records | St. Catherine University Student Behavioral Leave of Absence (non-discipline based)


I. Statement of Philosophy

The mission of St. Catherine University provides for excellence in education through the search for truth and justice. In accordance with this mission, the University expects all students and faculty to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity and personal conduct. Both require more than following specific rules; they also require a wholeness and soundness in each individual. They lead us to bring ourselves fully to our tasks, recognize and respect others, listen and contribute, study and respond. The University is a community that depends on the integrity of its members in respectful association with each other.

The specific standards of academic honesty and student behavior listed here reflect established traditions of scholarship and citizenship recognized at our University and elsewhere. They show specific ways that an overall climate of integrity is maintained. Our goal in articulating these standards is not simply to achieve adherence to them, but more importantly, to encourage the growth of intellectual and moral maturity, to appreciate and respect the work of scholars past and present, and to foster wholeness and connection in our living university community.

St. Catherine University is committed to the development of an environment that supports the University's mission of fostering academic and personal excellence in students.  To this end, the University has identified standards of behavior that it considers essential to the educational mission and membership in community life at St. Catherine. The Student Code of Conduct and Community Expectations allow for the review of behavior that violates University policy and standards of student conduct.

The conduct standards outlined by the Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS) as well as in the 'Joint Statement on Rights and Freedoms of Students' (National Association for Student Personnel Administrators) are used as guidelines for the Student Code of Conduct and Community Expectations.

II. Community Expectations

St. Catherine University has a proud history of providing an environment conducive to learning, living and working. This history includes a commitment to the core values of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, founders and sponsors of the University. These values include social justice, hospitality, care for the dear neighbor as well as a commitment to shared standards of behavior for all community members. Foundational expectations for student interaction at St. Catherine University include:

  1. Academic integrity is a core set of values and principles.  The International Center for Academic Integrity defines academic integrity as “a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to five fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility. From these values flow principles of behavior that enable academic communities to translate ideals to action.”  St. Catherine University subscribes to these fundamental values.  For students, these principles lie at the heart of the value of their education – any transgression compromises the worth of a St. Catherine degree. For faculty and staff, too, a high standard of academic integrity is a testament to academic and professional excellence. To share this common standard of behavior and set of values is critical to the mission of the University.
  2. St. Catherine University community celebrates and encourages the free exchange of ideas and opinions. For exchange to occur, there must be continuous acceptance of freedom of expression and civility in disagreement; and,
  3. Students are expected to be responsible members of St. Catherine University community and the larger society and to honor and respect differences in culture and religion.

Additional expectations are provided in the Students' Rights and Responsibility Statement.

III. Definitions

  1. Academic Dishonesty is fully defined in the St. Catherine University Academic Integrity Policy.
  2. Campus means all property owned, leased or operated by the University.
  3. Co-curricular activities are those activities that take place outside the classroom that complement students’ academic experiences at St. Catherine University.  These include but are not limited to involvement in student clubs and organizations, internships, volunteer opportunities, athletics and intramurals, and leadership roles.
  4. University community means the students, faculty, and staff of St. Catherine University.
  5. University computer facilities applies to all university-owned, leased or operated computing or information technology-related items, whether located in public spaces, residence halls, apartments or private offices, as well as remote communications links from off-campus when privately-owned computers are used to connect to St. Catherine computer facilities. (Updated June 20, 2013)
  6. Formal Process takes place when a student is charged with a violation of one or more of the Student Code of Conduct and Community Expectations regulations.
  7. Hearing officer refers to any of the following:  the Dean of Student Affairs, the Associate Dean for Students and Retention, the Assistant Dean of Student Support and Outreach, the Director of Residence Life, the Associate Director of Residence Life, and the Residence Life Area Directors. Additionally, the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of Academic Advising and, serve as Hearing Officers in cases of academic dishonesty.
  8. Parties to a hearing refers to the complainant(s), the accused, and the hearing officer.
  9. Student includes all persons enrolled at the University.  For disciplinary purposes, enrollment begins when a student commences activities with a University-sponsored organization or University academic, administrative, or athletic operating unit.  Enrollment continues during suspensions and breaks between terms. Enrollment ceases when a student graduates, withdraws, takes a leave-of-absence or is expelled or dismissed from the institution. Depending on the nature of the disciplinary action taken, the Dean of Student Affairs and/or the appropriate Academic Dean will determine the status of any individual with respect to this section.
  10. Preponderance of Evidence is used as the standard for proof for holding a student responsible for alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct. A preponderance of evidence means that upon weighing the evidence, a hearing officer believes it is more likely than not that the student has committed the violation(s) alleged in the complaint.
  11. University official includes any person employed by the university who performs assigned administrative or professional responsibilities.

IV. Code of Conduct

St. Catherine University’s standards of conduct are stated here as the Code of Conduct. This code does not replace or reduce the obligations to comply with civil or criminal laws. The student judicial process is not intended as a substitute for any legal action available to the student or the University. Should an act violate both University regulations and public law, the student may be subject to dual jurisdiction. Engaging in any of the following conduct on campus or off campus is a violation of the St. Catherine University Student Code of Conduct:

A student found to have violated any of the following regulations will be subject to a maximum sanction of expulsion or any sanction not less than a warning.

  1. Violation of local, state or federal law, on- or off-campus, when such violation of the law is directly related to the university community.
  2. Violation of the Student Code of Conduct while on probation or violation of the terms or conditions of that probation.
  3. Academic dishonesty, defined as any deliberate attempt to falsify, fabricate or otherwise tamper with data, information, records, or any other material that is relevant to a student's participation in any course, laboratory, or other academic exercise or function. Most, although not all, such attempts fall into one or more of the following three categories (see St. Catherine University Academic Integrity Policy for details):
    1. Cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty which are intended to gain unfair academic advantage.
    2. Plagiarism, defined as deliberately presenting work, words, ideas, theories, etc., derived in whole or in part from a source external to the student as though they are the student's own efforts.
    3. Other academic misconduct, including but not limited to falsifying or fabricating data, records, or any information relevant to a student's participation in any course or academic exercise, or tampering with such information as collected or distributed by the faculty member.
  4. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of persons, including oneself, and disrupts the normal and expected functioning of the University and the participation of students in the programs and services provided by the University. Such conduct could include but is not limited to physical assault, psychological/emotional abuse (bullying), intimidation, harassment, slander, libel, or extreme use or abuse of alcohol or other drugs.
  5. Fighting, disturbing any lawful assembly or meeting, using abusive language, or engaging in boisterous or noisy conduct that tends to arouse alarm, resentment or anger in others on campus or at University-sponsored or supervised activities. 
  6. Conduct, on or off campus, that is detrimental to the good of the University or discredits the University, or which adversely and seriously affects the student's suitability as a member of the academic or residential community. 
  7. Disruption of operations of the University, defined as an action or combination of actions by an individual or group that unreasonably interferes with, hinders, obstructs or prevents the regular and essential operation of the University or infringes upon the rights of others to participate freely in its programs and services. 
  8. Discrimination, defined as intentionally treating a person unequally on the basis of race, age, sex, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.
  9. Sexual harassment, sexual assault, or any other form of sexual violence or misconduct. (See St. Catherine University Policy on Title IX,  Sexual Assault, Harassment and Misconduct.)
  10. The possession, purchase, manufacture, distribution, sale, or offer for sale of any illegal drug or the manufacture, distribution, sale, offer for sale, purchase or possession of any illegal drug or narcotic, including but not limited to barbiturates, hallucinogens, amphetamines, cocaine, opium, heroin, or marijuana or drug paraphernalia.
  11. Use or possession of controlled substances, except as permitted by law and University policy. (See St. Catherine University Alcohol and Drug Policy.)
  12. Use or possession of alcoholic beverages, except as permitted by law and University policy. (See St. Catherine University Alcohol and Drug Policy.)
  13. Use, possession or carrying of explosives, fireworks, firearms, knives, ammunition, or other weapons or dangerous materials on campus property or at University-sponsored or supervised activities.
  14. Arson, falsely reporting a fire/situation, activating emergency warning equipment, or misusing fire/safety equipment.
  15. Forgery, alteration, destruction of, or misuse of University documents, records, identification cards, issued keys, or papers.
  16. Knowingly providing false information to the University, including knowingly making false oral or written statements to University officials. 
  17. Purporting to be or misrepresenting oneself as another person, or a representative of an organization or the University, without consent or authority.
  18. Unauthorized entry into or use of University facilities or equipment, or entering a facility or the property of another person without prior consent or authority.
  19. Unauthorized use of electronic or other devices to make an audio or video record of any person while on University premises without his/her prior knowledge or without his/her effective consent. This includes, but is not limited to, taking pictures of another person in a gym, locker room, restroom or any other location where a person might have a reasonable expectation of privacy. 
  20. Theft or other abuse of computer time, including but not limited to:
    1. Unauthorized entry into a file to use, read or change the contents, or any other purpose.
    2. Unauthorized transfer or illegal downloading and/or distributing of a file, including, but not limited to, copyrighted music, movies, software or other protected works. This includes unauthorized viewing or capture of content delivered by streaming technology.
    3. Unauthorized use of another individual's identification and password not authorized by Computing Services.
    4. Use of computer facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member or University official.
    5. Use of computer facilities to copy, save or send obscene or abusive messages.
    6. Use of computer facilities to interfere with normal operation of the University's computer systems.
    7. Unauthorized installation of software on computer lab or residence hall computers.
    8. Sending excessive email messages, locally or over the network, including chain letters, advertisement and solicitations.
    9. Online misconduct. Students are cautioned that behavior online can subject them to University conduct action. Students must also be aware that blogs, web pages, social media devices such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and similar online postings are in the public sphere and are not private. These postings can subject a student to charges of conduct violations if evidence of policy violations is posted online. The University does not regularly seek to discover this online information but may take action if and when such information is brought to the attention of University officials. (Refer to St. Catherine University Social Media Policy and Social Media Guidelines and Best Practices for Students, Clubs & Organizations.)
  21. Theft of, damage to or unauthorized use of University property or property of any of its members or visitors.
  22. Incurring financial obligations on behalf of a person, organization or the University improperly or without consent or authority.
  23. Gambling for money or other things of value, except as permitted by law.
  24. Violation of University policies or regulations contained in any official publication or administrative announcement of the University. This includes but is not limited to LeGuide, the University academic catalogs, Residence Life Housing and Dining Agreement, and Residence Life Community Policies.
  25. Failure to comply with the directives of University officials acting in the performance of their duties, including failure to present identification to such officials upon request. This also includes failure to comply with or fulfill conditions of sanctions imposed by the University.

V. Sanctions

The following sanctions comprise the range of official actions that may be imposed for violations of the Code of Conduct. One or more sanctions may be imposed. Repeated violations usually justify increasingly severe sanctions.

  1. Sanctions for academic dishonesty may include but are not limited to assigned grades of "F," "0" (zero) or "NC" (no credit) on any projects, tests, papers, assignments or courses involved.
  2. Warning. A notice to students that their conduct has been questionable and that future breaches of conduct will be treated more severely. Additional educational sanctions or community service may be assigned.
  3. Probation. A trial period during which students must behave in a manner acceptable to the University. The status of probation is assigned for a specific period of time. A Hearing Officer may establish terms of probation which restrict the student's participation in co-curricular activities. While on probation, students are encouraged to seek advice and counsel from appropriate offices. Violation of the terms of probation or further incidents of misconduct may result in suspension from the University for no less than one full academic semester. The terms of probation may include requirements including but not limited to the following:
    1. An assignment in which the student is required to perform some type of work.  This may include but is not limited to an educational research project, reflection paper, or some form of community service work.
    2. A counseling referral whereby the student is strongly encouraged or required to attend counseling sessions.
    3. Completion of mandatory assessments, including but not limited to psychological or chemical dependency evaluation.
    4. Restriction of privileges. Probation status may affect qualifications for some awards, prizes or aid, particularly those stipulating conduct acceptable to the University. Also, participation in or use of University programs and services may be restricted.  These restrictions may include but are not limited to on-campus residency, parking privileges, or participation in study abroad programs, student clubs organizations, or intercollegiate or intramural sports.
  4. Suspension. An action that excludes students for a specific period of time from course registration or class attendance and residence on the campus. Use of University facilities is also revoked by this action unless otherwise agreed upon. Upon termination of the period of suspension, students shall be considered for readmission according to academic admission standards then in effect. If a student is readmitted, further incidents of misconduct may result in permanent expulsion.
  5. Expulsion. The permanent restriction by the University from course registration, class attendance, and residence on the campus. Use of University facilities is also revoked by this action unless otherwise agreed to.
  6. Loss of Privilege. The withdrawal of a privilege or use of a service, including denial of housing, for a specific period of time.
  7. Restitution. Requires students to pay for damages to University property or the property of University community members, its guests, or others harmed by a student’s actions. Also requires restitution for misappropriated or stolen University funds. Such reimbursements may be required of any student who alone, or as a member of a group, organizes or knowingly participates in the events causing the damage or loss.

VI. Hearing Officers

  1. Composition. For all non-academic violations, the role of Hearing Officer will be assumed by the Dean of Student Affairs, the Associate Dean for Students and Retention, the Assistant Dean for Student Support and Outreach, the Director of Residence Life, the Associate Director of Residence Life, or a Residence Life Area Director. For academic misconduct cases, the role of Hearing Officer may be assumed by the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of Academic Advising, or the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (College for Women).
  2. Responsibilities. Responsibilities of the Hearing Officer include providing integrity and oversight to the hearing process and record-keeping, determining the hearing method for resolving complaints, imposing University sanctions, and serving as liaison to the student upon whom conduct sanctions have been imposed.
  3. Jurisdiction. University Hearing Officers shall have jurisdiction over all complaints alleging a violation of the St. Catherine University Code of Conduct and Community Expectations. Unless otherwise noted, complaints alleging violations of the Code of Conduct (with the exception of violations of academic misconduct) should be filed with the Dean of Student Affairs. Complaints will be assigned to the appropriate Hearing Officer including the Associate Dean for Students and Retention, the Assistant Dean for Student Support and Outreach, the Director of Residence Life, the Associate Director of Residence Life or a Residence Life Area Director. Unless otherwise noted, complaints alleging violation of academic misconduct should be filed with the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of Academic Advising, or the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (College for Women).
  4. Appeals. Appeals shall be heard by either the Dean of Student Affairs or their designee, for non-academic integrity cases. For cases involving academic integrity, the appropriate Academic Dean their designee will hear appeals.

VII. Judicial Procedures

  1. Filing a complaint or reporting violations. In cases where attempts to resolve issues of alleged misconduct through other means are exhausted, any member of the University community may file a complaint with the appropriate judicial authority against a student for an alleged violation of the Code of Conduct or Residence Life Community Policies.
    1. Disposition of complaints against students in the residence halls.
      1. All complaints involving residence hall students and occurring in the St. Paul campus residence halls or apartments should be filed with the Director of Residence Life, who will either adjudicate the matter or forward it to another appropriate Hearing Officer.
    2. Disposition of complaints regarding incidents occurring outside the residence halls or apartments.
      1. All complaints involving incidents not occurring in the residence halls or apartments should be filed with the Assistant Dean for Student Support and Outreach who will either adjudicate the matter or forward it to another appropriate Hearing Officer.
    3. Disposition of complaints against students regarding academic dishonesty.  Complaints alleging academic dishonesty should be filed with the appropriate faculty member or in the Academic Advising Office. Students, faculty and staff should refer to the Academic Integrity Policy and elsewhere in this document for details regarding proper procedures for the review and adjudication of allegations of academic dishonesty.
  2. Preliminary Investigation
    1. After receiving a complaint, a Hearing Officer shall conduct a preliminary investigation to determine whether the alleged violation(s) occurred and constitute a violation of the Code of Conduct and Community Expectations.
    2. The hearing office will request the alleged violator to meet with the student for a “pre-hearing interview.”  In the pre-hearing interview, the Hearing Officer will discuss the allegations and explain possible resultant charges, inform the accused of their rights, discuss the hearing procedures, and describe sanctions allowed under the Code of Conduct.
      1. If the Hearing Officer determines that the misconduct did not take place, the Hearing Officer may dismiss the complaint. The Hearing Officer's decision to dismiss the complaint is final.
      2. If the complaint is not dismissed and if the student does not contest the validity of the charges, the Hearing Officer can, at their discretion and with the student’s consent, resolve the matter by holding an immediate hearing. The Hearing Officer will consider the severity of the alleged misconduct before deciding whether to proceed with an immediate hearing.
      3. If the complaint is not dismissed and the student contests the charges, the Hearing Officer will formally charge the individual(s) against whom the complaint is brought and proceed with the Code of Conduct hearing process.

VIII. Hearing Procedures

  1. The hearing will be conducted in accordance with the following procedures:
    1. The Hearing Officer will provide the student with written notification of the alleged violation(s) of the Code of Conduct and Community Expectations with which they're being charged.  The notice shall identify any standards of conduct which the student has allegedly violated.
    2. The notice will include a request to meet with the Hearing Officer within a specific period of time. A hearing shall normally be scheduled not more than seven academic days after the student has been notified of the alleged violations.
    3. The hearing shall be private. All parties to the hearing, including witnesses and others in attendance, are expected to keep confidential of the proceedings of the hearing.
    4. All parties to a hearing at the time of presentation of formal alleged violations will be provided with a copy of the hearing procedures that govern the Hearing Officer before which they are to appear.
    5. On behalf of the University, the allegations and evidence may be presented by a person designated by the Hearing Officer.
    6. All parties shall have the right to be assisted by an advisor of their choice. That advisor must be a member of the University community. The adviser’s role may include:  a) assisting a student in the preparation of their case, b) accompanying student at all hearings, and c) advising and assisting in the preparation and presentation of appeals. An advisor is prohibited from speaking for or on behalf of a student who is a party to the hearing, and shall not participate in hearing proceedings. Advisors who violate these expectations may be removed from the hearing at the discretion of the Hearing Officer. Legal counsel may not be present at a hearing unless allegations of sexual violence are being heard.
    7. All parties shall have the right to hear all information presented and, through the Hearing Officer, question those who present it. Copies of incident reports, redacted as necessary, will be provided upon written request.
    8. All parties shall have the right to present information on their own behalf, including written or oral statements and physical evidence.
    9. All parties shall have the right to call a reasonable number of witnesses on their own behalf.  Such witnesses shall, through the Hearing Officer, be subject to questioning about their testimony. The Hearing Officer may request the names of these witnesses and the nature of their testimony in advance of the hearing. The Hearing Officer will determine which witnesses will or will not be allowed to provide testimony at the hearing. Also, parties shall have the right to request in advance the names of the persons who may testify against them at the hearing.
    10. The Hearing Officer may address questions to any party or to any witness called by the parties. However, the alleged cannot be compelled to testify against his/her wishes, with the understanding that to do shall not be interpreted as evidence of guilt.
    11. In the event any person disrupts the hearing, including the student charged or their advisor, the Hearing Officer may, at their discretion, exclude these persons and proceed with the hearing in their absence.
    12. A Hearing Officer may grant a new hearing if a party files a written application for a new hearing specifically identifying and disclosing newly-discovered evidence.

IX. Standards for Resolution

  1. Using “preponderance of evidence” as the standard, the Hearing Officer will determine whether the student committed a violation of the Code of Conduct. The Hearing Officer may consult with other appropriate individuals as part of their deliberations. The Hearing Officer may take into consideration such factors as the preferences of the parties, whether facts are in dispute, and any other relevant circumstances.
  2. Once a determination has been made, the Hearing Officer will determine what sanctions will be imposed and explain the rationale for those sanctions. The Hearing Officer will be responsible for monitoring the satisfactory completion of any sanctions assigned.

X. Notification of the Hearing Outcome

  1. The Hearing Officer will provide written notification to the accused and complainant of the outcome of the hearing within five business days of the hearing.
  2. Upon written request to the Dean of Student Affairs, individuals who are victims of crimes of violence have a right to be notified of the outcome of the complaint resolution process. Such notification shall be limited to the decision regarding whether the accused student was found responsible or not responsible, and assigned sanction(s). Complainants in receipt of such information may incur personal/civil liability for releasing such information to others.

XI. Procedure for Appeal of Decisions

  1. Appeals of decisions made by a Hearing Officer may be submitted by any party to the hearing, but must be submitted within three academic days following notice of the decision.
  2. An appeal may be submitted for the following reasons only, and can be denied if the stated reason(s) for the appeal do not meet these criteria:
    1. Procedural errors occurred during the hearing
    2. Sanction(s) imposed by the Hearing Officer were not justified by the nature of the offense
    3. A sanction of suspension or expulsion was imposed
  3. The appeal must be presented in writing and must identify the basis for the appeal.
  4. Appeals shall be heard by either the Dean of Student Affairs (or their designee) for non-academic integrity cases; the Academic Dean or their designee will hear appeals for cases involving academic integrity. 
  5. All appeal decisions made by the Dean for Student Affairs (or their designees) are final.

XII. Procedures for Resolving Issues of Academic Integrity

The process for investigating and resolving suspected violations of the Academic Integrity Policy differs from that of non-academic violations of the Code of Conduct.

  1. If a faculty member suspects a student has engaged in academic dishonesty, the faculty member should immediately initiate a discussion with the student to further evaluate grounds for suspicion and discuss specifics with the student about academic integrity issues. In the discussion with the student (s), the faculty member will explain the nature and circumstances of the alleged violation and hear the student’s side of the matter. 
  2. The faculty member will manage the process and keep records of all correspondence and/or contacts, and keep copies of papers, exams or other materials involved. The faculty member may consult with the Assistant Dean and Director of Academic Advising.
  3. If no violation is established, the faculty member should have a discussion with the student about the reasons for the suspicion, and discuss general issues of integrity.
  4. If a violation is established:
    1. The faculty member completes the Academic Integrity Referral form, Sections A, B and C. The faculty member reviews the completed form with the student. Please review the form carefully with the student to make sure the process is understood. The faculty member instructs the student to complete Section D.
    2. The faculty member provides the student with a copy of the signed form (Sections, A, B, C & D completed); the faculty member keeps one copy and forwards the original with documentation to the Academic Advising Office.
    3. The student has three business days from the date the faculty member signs the form to contest the allegation(s) and/or sanction(s) and to complete Section E on the form. The student is required to return the completed Academic Referral form to the Academic Advising Office.
    4. Academic Advising Office will check to see if the student has any prior violations of academic integrity:
      1. If there are prior violations,
      2. and /or if it is an egregious violation
      3. and/or if the student contests the allegation(s) and/or sanction(s),
      4. Academic Advising Office will notify the faculty member, conduct a preliminary hearing with the student and if appropriate conduct a follow up hearing and will give written notification to the faculty member and to the student of the final decision. The student will be informed of her/his right to file an Academic Grievance.  Note: Academic Advising Office may impose additional sanctions as outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.

XIII. Executive Authority

Notwithstanding the provisions of the hearing and judicial procedures sections of this document, the following actions may be taken when the Dean of Student Affairs has reasonable cause to believe that a student poses a threat to the safety of self or other persons or property or poses a disruptive threat to operations of the University.

  1. Summary Suspension of the Residence and Dining Agreement. A summary suspension of the Residence and Dining Agreement requires that the student vacate the residential community immediately.
    1.  It may be imposed upon students when the Dean of Student Affairs (or their designee, including but not limited to the Associate Dean of Students and Retention, the Assistant Dean of Student Support and Outreach, or the Director of Residence Life) has reasonable cause to believe the student poses a threat to the safety of self, other persons or property in the residential community, or poses a disruptive threat to the learning environment.
    2. In exercising such authority, the Dean of Student Affairs or their designee may rely on information supplied to them by others.
    3. Any student subject to summary suspension of the Residence and Dining Agreement shall be required to remain out of University housing until a hearing is completed. Requests for permission to be in University housing must be granted in writing and in advance by a Hearing Officer. Any student summarily suspended from their residence life contract and who returns to University housing during the period of suspension may be subject to permanent denial of housing and further sanctions.
    4. The hearing normally shall be held within seven days of the notice of suspension.
    5. Students removed from housing may be required to pay the full Residence and Dining Agreement balance.
  2. Summary Suspension. A summary suspension requires that the student immediately leave both University campuses.
    1. The University may impose summary suspension when the Dean of Student Affairs (or their designee, see above) has reasonable cause to believe the student poses a threat to the safety of self, other persons or property, or poses a disruptive threat to the operations of the University community.
    2. In exercising such authority, the Dean of Student Affairs (or their designee) may rely upon information supplied to him/her by others.
    3. Any student subject to summary suspension shall be required to remain off campus until a hearing is completed. Requests for permission to be on campus may be granted for a specific purpose; however, it must be granted in advance and in writing by a Hearing Officer. Any summarily suspended student who returns to the campus during the period of summary suspension may be subject to expulsion.
    4. The hearing normally shall be held within seven days of the notice of summary suspension.

XIV. Disciplinary Records

  1. Records of actions taken by Hearing Officers or hearing appeal authorities Dean of Student Affairs) regarding all student Code of Conduct violations will be kept on file in the Office of Student Affairs.
  2.  In instances of academic dishonesty, records of actions taken by Hearing Officers or appeal hearing authorities (Academic Dean) will be kept in the Academic Advising Office.
  3. Offices will share records in cases where there are violations of both Academic Integrity Policy and other Code of Conduct violations.
  4. Disciplinary records are considered part of a student’s educational record and are normally maintained for one year after graduation. Disciplinary files for students who withdraw from the University or are suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons will be maintained for an indefinite length of time.
  5. The University reserves the right to notify parents of students when judicial action results in suspension, expulsion, loss of housing privileges, or when the conduct involves alcohol or other drug violations. Disciplinary and hearing records may be disclosed by the University in appropriate circumstances such as in lawsuits or administrative proceedings in which they are relevant, or pursuant to subpoena or court order.
  6. Sanctions of suspension or expulsion are noted on student transcripts.

XV. St.Catherine University Student Behavioral Leave of Absence (non-discipline based)

This policy has been developed from the philosophy and ethic of care, a philosophy of holistic student learning, and a deep commitment to providing for the safety and well-being of our students. Care for the individual student, in the context of a Catholic liberal arts education for women, often requires balancing individual needs with the needs of the community. This policy will be utilized for situations in which a student’s behavior indicates a threat to the health and/or safety of self or others.

This policy allows the University to remove a student from University property and programs (including the residence halls and classes) either immediately (interim leave of absence) or after an appropriate review process (involuntary or voluntary leave of absence). Appropriate effort will be made to resolve situations voluntarily.

Examples of behaviors which may warrant the use of this policy include, but are not limited to: unresolved, ongoing and serious suicidal threats; imminent threats of harm to self or others; behavior which presents a reasonable threat to self or other (e.g. “cutting” behavior, expressions of self-harm or suicide ideation, etc.) and/or behavior that causes disruption to the community (e.g. residence hall, class, etc.).

This policy and subsequent procedures do not replace existing discipline-based or academic evaluation policies or procedures (e.g. Code of Conduct and Community Expectations, and the Academic Evaluation policies).

  1. Types of Behavioral Leaves. The type of behavioral leave issued depends explicitly on the facts and circumstances of each case and will be determined by the managing staff person in consultation with the Dean of Student Affairs. Each of the following types of leaves will be considered by the managing staff person if a student’s behavior poses an immediate and direct threat to themselves or others and disrupts the learning environment.
    1. Interim Behavioral Leave of Absence – is used to immediately restrict a student’s access to University programs and activities (including campus housing) for an interim period before a complete review process and final determination of the matter. The interim decision, including conditions associated with the leave, will remain in effect until a final determination is established. An Interim Behavioral Leave of Absence can be voluntary or involuntary, and is used for serious and urgent circumstances.
    2. Involuntary Behavioral Leave of Absence and Voluntary Behavioral Leave of Absence – are used to restrict a student’s access to University programs and activities (including campus housing) for a specified period of time after a complete review process.
  2. Procedure for Behavioral Leave of Absence. The Office of Student Affairs should be alerted by faculty, staff, students, or outside individuals or agencies when a student is observed engaging in threatening or concerning behavior. The Associate Provost and Dean for Student Affairs is responsible for overseeing this policy. The Dean of Student Affairs will designate others to manage each case and make recommendation regarding behavioral leaves, and are referred to from here on as the “managing staff person.”
  3. Interim Behavioral Leave of Absence Review Process. In situations in which the University has substantial evidence that a student has engaged in, or is judged to be likely to engage in, behavior that poses a danger of causing harm to self or others, or disrupting the learning environment and for which the determination is imminent, the Interim Behavioral Leave of Absence is initiated. The process is as follows:
    1. The leave will be communicated in writing to the student, St. Catherine staff and external medical professionals as appropriate.
    2. The interim leave, including conditions, will remain in effect for the period of time established for the leave or until a request for re-enrollment is approved by the managing staff person, the Dean of Student Affairs.
  4. Voluntary and Involuntary Leave of Absence Review Process. The review process for an Involuntary Behavioral Leave of Absence and Voluntary Behavioral Leave of Absence is initiated as the managing staff person deems appropriate and includes the following:
    1. The managing staff person will notify the student that a Behavioral Leave of Absence is under consideration. The managing staff person will discuss with the student the implications of and procedures relating to a Behavioral Leave of Absence. A copy of this policy will be provided to the student.
    2. The managing staff person will consult with appropriate staff and faculty, as feasible and appropriate, in determining what type of behavioral leave is most appropriate.  Those persons may include but are not limited to the following: a representative from the Academic Affairs Office (usually the appropriate Dean, Associate Dean, or designee); Director of Health and Wellness Center; Director of Counseling; Director of Counseling and Student Development; Director of Academic Advising (in some cases the faculty advisor); Director of Residence Life (for resident students); Director of Public Safety; and others (including outside medical staff or consulting psychologists) as deemed necessary by the managing staff person.
    3. The managing staff person can use the Early Alert System Team (EAST), a regularly meeting group, to assist in the intake of information as well as the evaluation of students under consideration for a Behavioral Leave of Absence. EAST membership includes the Dean of Student Affairs, Associate Dean for Students and Retention, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of Academic Advising, Assistant Dean of Student Support and Outreach, Director of Residence Life, Director of the Counseling Center, Director of Counseling and Student Development, Director of Public Safety and other staff as deemed appropriate.
    4. The review process will maintain a particular focus on the primary criteria for invoking a behavioral leave, specifically whether the student has engaged in, or is judged to be likely to engage in, behavior that poses a danger of causing harm to self or others and disrupts the learning environment.
    5. The managing staff person may require a student to have a physical or psychological evaluation or other consultation with outside healthcare providers if s/he believes it will facilitate a more informed decision.
    6. After the review is completed the managing staff person will communicate the decision to the student. For cases in which hospital staff or outside psychological or medical personnel are involved, formal communication regarding coordination of services will be provided as appropriate. Decisions about communicating with the student’s parents, family or guardian will be made by the managing staff person, in consultation with the Dean of Student Affairs.
  5. Effects on Student Status
    1. If a Behavioral Leave of Absence (interim, voluntary or involuntary) is issued, the University policies for withdrawal from courses, grading of course work, Residence and Dining Agreement cancellation, tuition refund and student financial aid policies will all normally apply.
    2. While on a Behavioral Leave of Absence a student is not allowed to participate in any University program or activity, including attending classes, involvement with student clubs or organizations, attending social events, etc. without express written permission by the managing staff person. In some cases a student on a behavioral leave will not be allowed on campus or to have contact with specified individuals. Conditions for a Behavioral Leave of Absence will be communicated as part of the initial notice and subsequently as they are established.
    3. In cases where a review for a Behavioral Leave of Absence occurs, but for which a behavioral leave is not issued, the managing staff person may require conditions for continued enrollment and participation in any or all University programs and activities. These conditions must be adhered to, as specified, or the student may be automatically placed on a Behavioral Leave of Absence. At any time, the managing staff person may initiate the policy and procedures of the Student Code of Conduct and Community Expectations.
  6. Request for Re-enrollment. In order to return to the University from a Behavioral Leave of Absence, regardless if a period of time noted in the original leave has expired, a student must formally request a removal from the leave. A written request for re-enrollment must be forwarded to the managing staff person who issued the original behavioral leave or the Dean of Student Affairs. The student will:
    1. Provide documentation of behavioral change
    2. Demonstrate successful participation in appropriate treatment/care plan
    3. Document readiness to resume curricular and co-curricular work
    4. Indicate that all stated conditions of the leave have been met
    5. Demonstrate that conditions established for return or re-enrollment can be fulfilled. It is within the managing staff persons’ sole discretion, on behalf of the University, to allow a student to return from a Behavioral Leave of Absence. The managing staff person can require additional conditions as part of the re-enrollment process.
  7. Right to Appeal. A student can appeal the issuance of a behavioral leave of absence as well as a decision to deny a request to re-enroll. Appeals should be submitted in writing to either the Dean of Student Affairs within 72 hours after the leave or the denial of the request to re-enroll is communicated to the student. All decisions by the Dean of Student Affairs are final.