Liberal Arts and Sciences - Associate

The liberal arts and science associate degree core is the foundation of all associate degrees. The focus of the liberal arts and science core is to provide value to the liberal arts and sciences course work by heavily integrating critical skills within the disciplinary learning. As part of a community of scholars, adult learners who choose the associate degree programs at St. Kate’s will experience both rigor and support in their learning. The liberal arts and sciences faculty are committed to the success of all students. Adult learners who complete their associate degrees at St. Catherine University will benefit from these value-added liberal arts and sciences courses, as they will graduate with strong disciplinary and critical skills.

ART 1020 Art and Artists — 2 credits

This course examines the great works of visual imagination throughout human history with special focus on contemporary American artists of diverse backgrounds. Classroom exercises promote the application of creative visual thinking to your own life and work. Offered in the College for Adults.

ART 1500 Folk Art — 2 credits

The goal of this course is to learn respect for ancient art forms and the people who developed them. There is a multimedia approach to folk art taking into account the historical, cultural, political and sometimes spiritual backgrounds of art forms that have proven to be remarkably resilient over time. It is a hands-on, process-oriented classroom experience; activities may include bread baking, beading, quilting, etc. Community artists join with the class in presenting a variety of art forms.

ART 2682 Directed Study — 2 credits

ART 2982 Topics In Art — 2 credits

The subject matter of this course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses.

BIOL 2400 General Anatomy and Physiology with Lab — 4 credits

(BIOL 2400 is required for all students in A.A.S. and A.S. programs.) The content of this course includes the basic anatomy and physiology of the body. After a preliminary introduction to such areas as terminology, overview of the body, the chemical basis of life, and morphology of cells and tissue, the larger interactions between structures and functions of the different body systems are summarized and integrated. Students will then apply this knowledge to critical questions. There is a laboratory requirement for the course. This course serves as an essential link to the University's healthcare and human-service programs. Offered in the College for Adults.

BIOL 2410 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology with Lab — 4 credits

This course is designed to enable students to gain a comprehensive, correlated knowledge of the anatomical structures and physiological mechanisms of the human body. The course provides an organizational framework of unifying principles and concepts together with factual data presented in a way that facilitates application to subsequent patho-physiological and clinical courses. The course format includes both lecture and discussion. Students will learn anatomical and physiological concepts through structured collaborative learning exercises, including the analysis of case studies. There is a laboratory requirement for this course. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2400.

BIOL 2420 Human Disease — 2 credits

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of disease. Students will study a range of infectious, chronic and genetic diseases; students will learn the etiology of these diseases, their clinical manifestations, principles of treatment and prevention where applicable. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite with concurrency: BIOL 2400.

BIOL 2450 Applied Microbiology with Lab — 4 credits

In this course students will study the role of microorganisms in health and disease with emphasis on modes of action and mechanisms of spread of infectious microorganisms. Areas of study include microbial structure, physiology, genetics, growth characteristics and host strategies to protect against and provide recovery from microbial disease. Laboratory experiences include sterile techniques and major procedures used to grow, observe, characterize and identify microorganisms. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2400, BIOL 2410; high school chemistry or CHEM 1100 preferred.

BIOL 2984 Topics — 4 credits

Offered in the College for Adults.

BIOL 2991 Topics — 1 credit

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses. Offered in the College for Adults.

ENGL 1991 Topics — 1 credit

ENGL 2100 Prose and Poetry — 2 credits

This writing-based literature course introduces students to a variety of ways in which the written word can be used to express, analyze and critique an array of personal, cultural and political themes and experiences. Students will study closely the writings of emerging, established and renowned authors working in a variety of genres (journals, short fiction, drama, poetry, memoir). Student will simultaneously engage in a series of creative writing exercises and projects that allow them to explore the implications of the written word in their daily life. In addition, students are required to attend several readings by published authors in the local community, as well as give a final reading of their own creative works at the end of the term. Offered in the College for Adults.

ENGL 2500 The Short Story — 2 credits

This writing-based literature course introduces you to the skill of reading and writing short stories. You will read and analyze written work by emerging, established and renowned authors. You will also experiment with your own short story writing to facilitate learning about the varying techniques for writing effective short stories. Both reading and writing activities focus on the intentional use of style and language in short stories. Offered in the College for Adults.

ENGL 2683 Directed Study — 3 credits

ENGL 2982 Topics In Literature — 2 credits

The subject matter of this course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. All topics courses are writing-based literature courses. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses. Possible topics include Culture and Film, World Literature, Contemporary Poetry and Folklore.

MATH 1201 College Algebra for the Health Sciences I — 2 credits

This introductory math course is designed specifically for students in Associate Degree healthcare programs. Students will practice mathematical techniques and develop problem solving skills that they will use in the advanced math and science courses in their program. Students will gain mathematical fluency in such areas as polynomials, algebraic inequalities, rational functions, exponential equations and graphs, and logarithmic models. Offered in the College for Adults.

MATH 1202 College Algebra for the Health Sciences II — 2 credits

This course will allow students to develop mathematical fluency in such areas as polynomials, algebraic inequalities, rational functions, exponential graphs, and logarithmic models. These skills will serve students in future program courses and also during their careers as health care professionals. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: MATH 1201 or college algebra.

MATH 2682 Directed Study — 2 credits

Directed study is provided for students whose unusual circumstances prohibit taking a regularly scheduled course but who need the material of that course to satisfy a requirement. Availability of this faculty-directed learning experience depends on faculty time and may be limited in any given term and restricted to certain courses.
Prerequisites: Faculty, department chair and dean approval.

PHIL 2000 Ethical Problems in Healthcare — 2 credits

This course is designed to prepare students to participate in the ethical dimension of healthcare as a prospective consumer as well as a provider. The course includes an examination of topics selected from the current literature of bioethics (abortion, euthanasia, genetics, etc.), a presentation of methods of processing ethical problems, and analysis of the status and role specific to the healthcare deliverer as this relates to ethical decision making. Intended for second-year students. Offered in the College for Adults.

PHIL 2030W Healthcare Ethics — 3 credits

This course is designed to prepare the student to participate as a provider in the ethical challenges of health care. The course includes an examination of topics selected from the current literature of bioethics (abortion, euthanasia, genetics etc.), a presentation of methods for processing ethical dilemmas, and an analysis of the status and role specific to the technical health care deliverer as this relates to decision-making. Practitioner codes of ethics will be examined with specific focus on the role of the informed practitioner in creating a more just society. Offered in the College for Adults.

PHIL 2040 Ethical Problems and Ethical Practice — 4 credits

This course is designed to prepare the student to participate as a provider in the ethical challenges of health care. The course includes an examination of topics selected from the current literature of bioethics (abortion, euthanasia, genetics etc.), a presentation of methods for processing ethical dilemmas, and an analysis of the status and role specific to the technical health care deliverer as this relates to decision-making. Practitioner codes of ethics will be examined with specific focus on the role of the informed practitioner in creating a more just society. Offered in the College for Adults.

PHYS 2684 Directed Study — 4 credits

PSYC 1000 General Psychology — 4 credits

Orientation to contemporary scientific psychology including the study of learning and memory, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, biology and behavior, personality, individual differences, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy and developmental and social psychology. Offered in the College for Adults.

PSYC 1080 Abnormal Psychology Seminar — 1 credit

A concise review of selected psychological disorders, including etiology, prognosis, treatment options, and current issues. Disorders reviewed are within the categories of anxiety disorders, mood disorders, personality disorders, somatoform disorders, psychotic disorders, substance abuse disorders and eating disorders. This is an independent study course. This course supports the University's mission in its focus on human diversity and social responsibility. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2020 Lifespan Developmental Psychology — 4 credits

(Variable option, two credits each: see PSYC 2026 and PSYC 2027.) Scientific study of development from prenatal life through late adulthood, with emphasis on the interplay of psychological processes, heredity and environment. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2026 Lifespan Development: Theory and Methods, Conception/Prenatal Development to Middle Childhood — 2 credits

In this course you will learn scientific methods and theories in developmental psychology and will study the developing person from conception/prenatal development through middle childhood. Prenatal influences, physical growth patterns and cognitive and social development are covered along with the influence of family, peer and school environments. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2027 Lifespan Development: Adolescence, Adulthood and Death — 2 credits

In this course students will study the developing person from age 12 to late adulthood, including the physical, sexual, cognitive and social changes that occur with aging. Family, peer, school and work environments are covered in the teen and early adult years. Work and leisure environments, adult development within the family, and adjustment to aging, loss and death are covered in the middle and late adulthood periods. Offered in the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

PSYC 2681 Directed Study — 1 credit

PSYC 2991 Topics — 1 credit

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses. Offered in the College for Adults.

PSYC 2993 Topics — 3 credits

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses.

SSCS 2000 Human Ecology — 2 credits

Students are introduced to the basic concepts of ecosystems in relation to human behavior and human adaptations within these ecosystems. The role of the individual and society in contributing directly and indirectly to the quality of the environment is emphasized along with the impact of current environmental quality on the overall health of humans. Topics include: over-population, various forms of pollution, nutrition and resources. Offered in the College for Adults. Also offered as ECOL 2000.

SSCS 2040W Power, Inequality and Social Change — 4 credits

This course provides in-depth, critical analysis of uses of power both nationally and globally that result in inequality or, alternatively, in social change. Examples of national and global topics included are: systemic racism and privilege, civil rights in times of crisis, immigrant and refugee settlement, mass incarceration, the global glass ceiling, and social activism. Offered in the College for Adults.

STAT 1094 Statistical Analysis — 4 credits

This course is an introduction to fundamental uses and misuses of statistics. Exploratory data analysis, regression and correlation, uncertainty and randomness, intuitive probability, one- and two-sample inference, one-way analysis of variance, interpretation and communication of results are all involved. Use of computers is integrated throughout course. Offered every semester.
Prerequisites: High school higher algebra and appropriate level on mathematics/statistics placement assessment or ACT math score. Credit is given for only one of the following courses: ECON 1080, ECON 1090, HLTH 1090, STAT 1090 or PSYC 1090. Offered in the College for Adults.

THEO 1020 The Christian Journey — 2 credits

This course examines Christian faith claims, reflects on the religious dimension of human experience, explores the nature and function of faith, religion, and theology, and addresses the issues of God, salvation, sacrament, scripture and community with a particular emphasis on Catholic social teaching. This course satisfies both the associate and baccalaureate theology requirement. Offered in the College for Adults.

THEO 2040 The Sacramental Life — 3 credits

This course examines the relationship between illness, healing, and the Roman Catholic tradition of sacramental encounter. Course topics include Christian creedal statements, exploration of the spiritual disciplines within life and work, the relationship of spirituality to the healing arts, the meaning of and response to suffering, and the charism of healing. Offered in the College for Adults.

THEO 2040W The Sacramental Life — 3 credits

This course examines the relationship between illness, healing, and the Roman Catholic tradition of sacramental encounter. Course topics include Christian creedal statements, exploration of the spiritual disciplines within life and work, the relationship of spirituality to the healing arts, the meaning of and response to suffering, and the charism of healing. Offered in the College for Adults.

THEO 2683 Directed Study — 3 credits

THEO 2982 Topics in Theology — 2 credits

Topics courses develop specific topic areas related to Christian tradition. These courses do not duplicate present course offerings. These courses are announced yearly in the course schedule. These courses satisfy both the associate and baccalaureate theology requirement.