Crit Studies of Race,Ethnicity (CRST)

CRST 1120 Economics of Social Issues — 4 credits

This course involves the study of important relationships between economic growth, equity and public policies. It offers an economic perspective on current domestic and global social problems. Topics include crime, discrimination, inequality, the welfare system, social security, education, poverty, unemployment, health care, international trade and globalization. Also offered as WOST 1121, ECON 1120. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 1140 Race, Class, Gender and the Environment with Lab — 4 credits

This course is designed to acquaint students with the nature of scientific inquiry, the science behind current environmental issues, and how environmental issues have differentially affected various groups in society. In addition, what affected groups have done to address these issues and what we can do are addressed. Also offered as BIOL 1140. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 1200 Survey of U.S. Political and Social History, 1600-1900 — 4 credits

This course is a survey of U.S. political and social history from the colonial era to 1900, with emphasis on the multiracial and multicultural aspects of the American experience. Also includes an overview of women's social and political roles and status from 1600 to the achievement of suffrage. Also offered as HIST 1200. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2050W Foundations of Critical Studies of Race and Ethnicity — 4 credits

This course provides an overview of the key concepts and issues in the interdisciplinary study of race/ethnicity. The course serves as an introduction to the complexity of diverse racial/ethnic groups in the U.S., issues of racial formation, white privilege, individual and institutional discrimination, multiple differences and intersecting oppressions, racial/ethnic identity and collective resistance, as well as the global dimensions of race/ethnicity. Course materials facilitate engagement in critical analysis of textual and statistical information from a variety of disciplinary sources. Offered every term. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2150 Challenging Oppressions, Civic Engagement and Change — 4 credits

This course provides an in-depth overview of the dynamics of inequality, intersecting oppressions, models of civic engagement and systemic social change. Classism, racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism and speciesism are examined as systems of power and privilege that are socially constructed and subject to social change. This course bridges the classroom and the community, theory and practice through readings, discussions, guest speakers, visits to community partner agencies, and a community work and learning component. Also offered as SOCI 2150 and WOST 2150. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2151W Sociocultural Aspects of Dress — 4 credits

The course involves the study of social, psychological, cultural and aesthetic aspects of dress. Focus is on understanding multicultural diversity and broadening the perspective in which one views dress. Sustainable fashion as a cultural phenomenon is explored. This course includes cultural experience through a service learning component. Offered in the College for Women. Also offered as FASH 2150W.

CRST 2180 World Music — 4 credits

This course explores the ways people across the world make music. While the course covers music from countries such as South Africa, Indonesia, Bolivia, India, Trinidad, and Bosnia, it also investigates music in the US, paying particular attention to hip hop and American Indian music. Also offered as MUS 2180. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2200 People, Stories and Images: Qualitative Social Research — 4 credits

This hands-on seminar/practicum aims to familiarize students with principles of qualitative research and introduce them to various qualitative research methods used to examine social issues. Students will gain practical skills in designing and conducting qualitative research; they will also develop critical thinking skills in recognizing and negotiating the power dynamics and ethical dilemmas inherent in the research process. These skills are applicable in multiple disciplines and transferrable for lifelong learning and careers in a variety of settings, be it for government organizations or non-profits, dealing with domestic or international issues. Qualitative research skills also help us become a more reflective and engaging person! Also offered as SOCI 2200 and WOST 2200.

CRST 2210W Perspectives on Health and Aging — 4 credits

This course is a study of normal aging and related health issues from psychological, sociological and physiological perspectives. Students are introduced to a variety of successful lifestyles through ongoing contact with an elder mentor. Offered annually.

CRST 2220 Short Fiction — 4 credits

This introductory course explores short fiction, traditionally through the form of the short story. Varying by semester and instructor, some sections have investigated forms as various as the joke, the treaty, and the novella. Topics have included Reading Race, Fathers and Sons, and Fairy Tales for Adults. In each case, you closely investigate literary elements such as plot, character, theme and style along with the social significance of literature. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature.

CRST 2230 The Novel — 4 credits

An exploration of the novel, this course varies by instructor and semester. Topics may include Novels into Film, Six Degrees of Harry Potter, Oprah Books, Courtship and Marriage, and Lesbian Literature. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Also offered in Evening/Weekend/Online Program.

CRST 2240 Drama on the Page and on Stage — 4 credits

In order to truly appreciate the power of drama, students not only explore plays in their written form but also experience them as theatrical performances. As determined by instructor and semester, this course is organized around such themes as The Family Circle, Social Protest and Reform, Dreamers and Schemers, and the Self in Society. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature.

CRST 2250 Critical Hmong Studies — 4 credits

The Critical Hmong Studies course will engage students in a critical analysis of the changing nature of Hmong culture and Hmong identity worldwide. The course traces Hmong origin from China, and historical events to current time, including Hmong involvement in the Vietnam War, Hmong migration throughout the world, and Hmong life in host societies. Students will explore debates surrounding cultural identity, intergenerational conflict, changing traditions and cultural practices in host societies. In addition, students will examine gender issues, acculturation, the portrayal of Hmong in media, Hmong in education, and racism among others. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2280 Introduction to Literary Themes — 4 credits

Examine the cultural and historical themes of imaginative texts across multiple literary genres, including short and long fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Varying themes have included the Harlem Renaissance, Irish and Scottish Literature, Women on the Road, Portrayals of Native Americans in Poetry, Literature in Sickness and in Health, and Marriage and Family Relationships. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Also offered in Evening/Weekend/Online Program. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature.

CRST 2350 Asian American Identities — 4 credits

The Asian American Identities course will engage students in a critical analysis of the multiple, fluid and intersecting identities of members of the Asian diaspora. Beginning with Asian immigration to the United States in the 1800s through the existence of multi-generational families in the present day, students will learn to interrogate how the perceived identities of Asian Americans has shaped these histories and experiences, and how agency in Asian American self-identification has served to empower them, challenge assumptions and create new realities. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2500 Rule-makers and Rule-breakers: Deviance and Social Control — 4 credits

How does society create insiders and "deviant" outsiders? How are legal and medical labels created and applied? What role does race, class, gender, sexual orientation, age and ability play in the construction of deviance and the application of social control? Who is criminalized? Who is medicalized? How do these labels effect social opportunity and identity? The course includes study of the various types of deviance and social control, including formal/legal, medical/psychiatric labeling, and informal stigma with special attention to mass incarceration, the school-to-prison pipeline, and the medicalization of deviance. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women. Also offered as SOCI 2500 and WOST 2500.

CRST 2700 Social Movements-Social Change — 4 credits

Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the dynamics of collective behavior and social movements. A variety of social movements and counter movements are considered. The course emphasizes collective responses to inequality, and the role of race/ethnicity, class, gender and other differences in movements for social change. Offered alternate years. Also offered as SOCI 2700 and WOST 2700. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 2994 Topics — 4 credits

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3101 Communicating across Cultures, Identities and Differences — 4 credits

In the 21st century individuals continue to be marginalized because of their differences. The existence of racism, sexism, homophobia, and religious discrimination indicate that the categories separating individuals from one another fuel acts of hatred, oppression, and degradation, but why? What makes such discrimination possible? How do categories of people come to be seen as "different"? How does being "different" affect people's lived experience? What meaning does difference have at the level of the individual, social institution, or culture? What difference does difference make? This class will answer these questions by studying how communication plays a significant role in the construction of cultures identities and differences. Through such an inquiry students will learn how social, political, economic, racial, sexual, cultural and geographic differences impact the process of communication and consequently, cause conflict between groups and individuals that belong to different social categories. Through studying how cultures, identities and differences impact communication, students will develop strategies for effectively and ethically participating in an increasingly diverse cultural landscape. Also offered as WOST 3101 and COMM 3100. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

CRST 3160 Hispanics in the United States — 4 credits

Students will gain knowledge about the layered history and issues involving Hispanics and Latinos in the United States. As students discuss a number of materials, from writings, to film and documentaries, to the arts, to experiential learning tasks, students will increase their awareness of and experience with cross-cultural, bilingual ways of life, thinking, and being. Students will speak primarily in Spanish. Offered spring semester. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: SPAN 2110 or permission of instructor.

CRST 3162 Migration, Citizenship, Community — 4 credits

This course will help students cultivate sociological imagination around issues related to migration and immigration. Through reading theories and narratives of migration against each other, a successful student, at the end of the semester, should achieve a deeper understanding of the following questions: Why does mass migration happen? What are the social and political consequences of migration? What happens to people's cultures, identities, and sense of belonging when they cross national borders? What does the immigration debate reveal about the social fabric of the United States? Sociological understanding of these questions will help students make ethical decisions and assume leadership in their civic and political lives. Offered in the College for Women.
Recommended: SOCI 1000. Also offered as SOCI 3160.

CRST 3210 Family, Identity and Inequality — 4 credits

Family is an important social institution in which identities are formed and inequalities are reproduced. Highlights of this course include perspectives of families in poverty, LGBT families, transracial and transnational families. Students conduct research about family, identity, and inequality (race, class and gender) and consider strategies for social change and individual action. Offered alternate years. Also offered as CRST 3210 and WOST 3210.

CRST 3250 History of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights in the U.S. — 4 credits

The origins and evolution of American civil liberties and civil rights are covered from the colonial era through the 20th century civil rights and women’s rights movements. Course examines the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights and the roles of the Supreme Court, federal and state governments, and rights movements in the development of civil liberties and civil rights. Also offered as HIST 3250 and WOST 3251. Not open to first-year students.

CRST 3251 Cultural Anthropology — 4 credits

This is a survey of the evolution, integration and importance of culture. Students will develop an awareness of and appreciation for the variety of human cultural and subcultural adaptations, focusing on such institutions as economics, family, politics and religion. Ethnographic methods are also covered, as students learn to recognize and interpret cultural meaning. Also offered as SOCI 3250 and WOST 3250. Offered annually. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3300 Haves and Have-Nots — 4 credits

Students will study the causes of international inequality in the distribution of wealth to examine why some countries are rich and others are poor. Discussions critically examine contending theories of development and underdevelopment (modernization theory, dependency and world systems theories, cultural explanations and state-centric theories). Also offered as POSC 3300. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3340 Criminal Justice: From Policing to Punishment — 4 credits

The United States has more people in prison per capita than anywhere where in the world, with 2.3 million people in prison and jail and another 5 million on probation or parole. . How does this happen? What is “the prison industrial complex”? What social factors shape our approach to policing and punishment? Who is criminalizied and how? What role do race, class, and gender play in policing and punishment? This course analyzes the basic concepts and dynamics of the, including study of the personnel involved and experiences encountered in the system. This course offers students an in-depth look at the U.S. criminal justice system, and currently debated topics including police use of force and civilian killings, racial profiling, prosecutorial discretion, mass incarceration, use of solitary confinement, and the death penalty Alternative approaches and social movements related to criminal justice reform for both juveniles and adults will also be explored. Also offered as SOCI 3340. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3350 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict — 4 credits

Students will study theories of nationalism and the aspirations of nationalist actors in both domestic and international contexts. Particular attention is given to problems of citizenship and state formation; ethnicity and nationalism; democratic institutional design and political representation; and ethnic conflict. Case studies are drawn from the industrial democracies and the developing world. Also offered as POSC 3350. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3400 Biomedical Ethics — 4 credits

Overview of normative ethical theory. Application to topics in biomedicine: the concept of health, the provider-patient relationship, informed consent and refusal of treatment, truth-telling and confidentiality, research involving human subjects, life-sustaining treatment and physician-assisted death, reproductive decisions and technologies, genetic screening and interventions, allocation of scarce resources. Offered every semester. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults. Also offered as PHIL 3400.
Recommended: PHIL 2200W. Open to students with no prior work in philosophy, but such students should consult with the instructor or department chair before registering.

CRST 3401W Language as Power — 4 credits

This class will take you into the complex and often hidden intersections of language and power, focusing on the many ways in which language serves as a tool of power. It will examine how we negotiate power on several levels, both individually and socially; how words imply more than they say (and thus can be used to manipulate); how language policies in education and other societal institutions privilege some groups while oppressing others; and how oppressed groups use language to resist their oppression. Because language is so intimately tied to the communities that use it, we will examine language use through the lenses of race/ethnicity and gender among others. Also offered in Weekend Program. Also offered as WOST 3400W and ENGL 3400W. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. Does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults. Not open to first year students.

CRST 3450 Women's Issues from Global Perspectives — 4 credits

This course examines the construction of gender, gender inequality, women’s movement, and cultural representation of gender from a transnational perspective. This perspective emphasizes the connections between histories and conditions of different societies, particularly the power relations between the global North and the global South. Offered alternate years. Offered in the College for Women. Also offered as WOST 3450 and SOCI 3450.

CRST 3451 Development Economics: Examining Poverty and Inequality — 4 credits

This course explores the role of poverty and inequality in the process of economic development and growth. Students will examine the impact of social, political, and economic factors on poverty and how these factors relate to economic growth in developing countries. Topics include international financing of economic development, human and natural resources and their role in the development of economies, monetary policy and international aid. The emphasis of this course is on the role of women in national development and how this can impact the overall economy and economic stability of a developing country. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: ECON 1120 or ECON 2610 or ECON 2620. Also offered as ECON 3450 and WOST 3452.

CRST 3460 Managing a Diverse Workforce — 4 credits

This course provides a hands-on approach to understanding how to work with people from different cultures. Students are asked to examine their own values and perspectives, to become aware of their own biases, and through examining different cultural orientations, to work towards greater understanding and acceptance of difference. The course focuses on the impact of diverse cultures on the work environment and management practices that enhance the full utilization of human diversity. Students will learn about belief systems, attitudes and conditioning and how these cognitive processes interact with the management of a diverse workforce. The management functions, organization behavior, change and productivity are examined in relation to issues of diversity. Anyone planning to work outside the home, regardless of discipline or field, can benefit from this course. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults. Also offered as MGMT 3460.

CRST 3470 Sociology of the Law — 4 credits

In-depth understanding of the interplay between law and society. Emphasis is on U.S. law and legal systems, but consideration is given to historical, cross-cultural and international variations. Topics include: historical foundations and current directions of law in the U.S., the organization of law and legal systems; sociological factors that shape the creation, interpretation, and application of the law; and law as a mechanism of social control and a tool for social change. Also offered as SOCI 3470. Offered alternate years.

CRST 3490 Topics in Language Studies — 4 credits

The subject matter of this course varies. Topics may include: World Englishes; Linguistic Human Rights; Teaching English as a Second Language; Language, Race & Ethnicity; and Critical Discourse Analysis. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women. Also offered as ENGL 3490.

CRST 3510 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity — 4 credits

This course examines structured inequality related to race and ethnicity. The course focuses on current research and theory pertinent to the social construction of race/ethnicity, inter-group relationships, power, stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination, systemic racism, and the ways that race intersects with class, gender and other differences. Includes historical and contemporary experiences of racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. Offered alternate years. Also offered as SOCI 3510 and WOST 3510.

CRST 3560 Women in America to 1920 — 4 credits

Roles, status and expectations of women are covered from the colonial era to 1920; includes developments in family, sex, education, work, dress, politics; also covers the feminist movement of the 19th century. Also offered as HIST 3560 and WOST 3560. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3650 U.S. Women Since 1920 — 4 credits

This course covers roles, status and expectations of women in the United States from 1920 to the present; developments in family, sex, education, politics, work and dress; feminist ideologies, their social and intellectual contexts and opposition. Also offered as HIST 3650 and WOST 3650. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

CRST 3860 Neighborhoods, Cities and Inequality — 4 credits

Analysis of the emergence of cities, urban social systems, urbanization and urbanism with special attention to international urban patterns. Topics include patterns of suburbanization, city lifestyles and social environment of the cities, ethnic diversity, urban planning, housing programs and urban change, urban future. Includes a service-learning component. Also offered as SOCI 3860. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 3900 Feminist Philosophy — 4 credits

This course involves the exploration of feminist contributions in the traditional philosophical inquiries of metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics, as well as questions unique to feminist thought. Students will explore the social conception of the self, social constructions of knowledge, the objectivity and subjectivity debates, standpoint epistemologies, and the philosophic implications of multiple differences, including race, class, sexuality. Also offered as PHIL 3900 and WOST 3900. Offered annually. Offered in the College for Women.

CRST 4600 Leadership and the Art of Persuasion — 4 credits

This course studies the practice of leadership communication from within the framework of persuasive, effective, ethical and enduring leadership. By studying the communication practices of female leaders in the cultural, political, business and intellectual sectors of society and by focusing on the unique challenges faced by these leaders as women in particular, this course provides practical examples of different forms of effective leadership particularly well-suited to the St. Kate's student. To provide students with a foundation through which they can begin to act as leaders in their daily lives, these practical examples are discussed in conjunction with theories of leadership, persuasion and argumentation. Also offered as COMM 4600 and WOST 4600. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.
Prerequisites: for majors: COMM 3070W, COMM 3090. For nonmajors: instructor permission. Senior standing for all students.

CRST 4602 Internship — 2 credits

An internship is a structured out-of-class learning experience that takes place on or off campus and includes a substantial work component. An internship involves the student in a particular profession in an exploratory way to test career interests and potential. To initiate an internship experience meet with the internship coordinator in the Career Development Office and then with a faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: Instructor and department chair permission and CRST 2050W.

CRST 4604 Internship — 4 credits

An internship is a structured out-of-class learning experience that takes place on or off campus and includes a substantial work component. An internship involves the student in a particular profession in an exploratory way to test career interests and potential. To initiate an internship experience meet with the internship coordinator in the Career Development Office and then with a faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: Instructor and department chair permission and CRST 2050W.

CRST 4684 Directed Study — 4 credits

CRST 4850W Senior Seminar — 4 credits

This capstone course offers an in-depth examination of a topic in critical studies of race and ethnicity. Topics change with each offering. You engage in independent research and presentations incorporating interdisciplinary literature and perspectives on race/ethnicity. Offered every other year. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisites: CRST 2050W, CRST 3510.

CRST 4952 Independent Study — 2 credits

Independent study offers students the opportunity for specialized research not covered in a course offering, by the action project or thesis. Students work with a faculty advisor to develop a learning contract, which specifies the content and objectives of the study as well as the requirements and procedures for evaluation. The amount of credit earned for the study also is included in the learning contract.
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty and department chair or program director.

CRST 4954 Independent Study — 4 credits

Independent study offers students the opportunity for specialized research not covered in a course offering, by the action project or thesis. Students work with a faculty advisor to develop a learning contract, which specifies the content and objectives of the study as well as the requirements and procedures for evaluation. The amount of credit earned for the study also is included in the learning contract.
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty and department chair or program director.

CRST 4994 Topics — 4 credits

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses.