English (ENGL)

ENGL 1100 Composition — 2 credits

This course provides guided practice in writing college-level papers and must be taken during students' first year (preferably first semester) at the University. Course readings are drawn from a variety of prose models from diverse cultures. Written exercises and assigned papers focus on purpose, organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, revision and grammatical conventions.

ENGL 1250 Human Experience in Literature — 4 credits

Literature moves us by capturing the dilemmas, struggles and triumphs of human existence. The poetry, fiction and drama explored in this course capture a wide array of societies and are drawn from a variety of time periods. Studied in their cultural-historical context, these literary works will help students appreciate the rich diversity in human experience. In response to these works, students will integrate their personal reactions with textual evidence to improve their critical reading and writing skills. Class discussions encourage thoughtful speaking and active listening. Offered every semester and in summer. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults. Meets liberal arts core requirement in literature.

ENGL 1300 Building Reading and Writing Skills for College Success — 4 credits

Good readers make good writers. This course is designed to help students become a better writer in their college courses by helping them to strengthen their critical reading and thinking skills. Sharpening these skills will lead to improved handling of paper organization, content, and clarity of ideas. Further, by approaching writing as a process, this course will help develop and strengthen key writing skills, such as thesis formulation, paragraph construction, sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and revision. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 1991 Topics — 1 credit

ENGL 2100 Prose and Poetry — 2 credits

This writing-based literature course introduces students to a variety of ways in which the written word can be used to express, analyze and critique an array of personal, cultural and political themes and experiences. Students will study closely the writings of emerging, established and renowned authors working in a variety of genres (journals, short fiction, drama, poetry, memoir). Student will simultaneously engage in a series of creative writing exercises and projects that allow them to explore the implications of the written word in their daily life. In addition, students are required to attend several readings by published authors in the local community, as well as give a final reading of their own creative works at the end of the term. Offered in the College for Adults.

ENGL 2120 The Immigrant Perspective in Literature — 4 credits

This course explores the immigrant perspective in literature, in particular issues of cultural adaptation and change and educational aspirations of immigrant women in the U.S. Students will read novels and memoirs written by and about immigrants in the U.S. and readings that provide the historical and socio-cultural context for each of them. Through the exploration of literary content that is personally meaningful, students will increase their fluency and comprehension in reading academic English and develop analytical and critical reading skills. Students will also develop confidence and ease contributing to class and group discussions. Meets liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: For non-native speakers of English by placement or instructor's permission only.

ENGL 2130W Written Communication for College — 4 credits

This course focuses on research-based writing and includes extensive practice paraphrasing, summarizing, analyzing, synthesizing, integrating, and documenting outside sources. Also addressed are the cultural assumptions of U.S. academic writing, with particular attention given to plagiarism and personal voice. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing, preferably related to their intended major. Students will also work on editing their papers for errors. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: For non-native speakers of English by placement or instructor's permission only.

ENGL 2140 Grammar in Writing — 2 credits

This course focuses on language-related issues in writing: grammar, vocabulary and punctuation. Instruction focuses on advanced grammar topics and areas of difficulty for non-native speakers of English. In addition, students will practice editing papers they are currently writing (or have written) for grammatical errors, using a process developed specifically for non-native speakers of English. Students will also work on increasing syntactic variety and complexity in their writing.
Prerequisite: For non-native speakers of English. By placement or instructor's permission only.

ENGL 2200 Literary Theory and Practice — 4 credits

Designed as the foundational majors' course for further study in English, English 2200 provides an in-depth initiation into the practice of critical theory in the analysis and interpretation of texts in various genres and sets theoretical frameworks and practical applications for literature courses to follow. Integrate appropriate library research methods into critical analysis. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Intended for English majors/minors and those interested in advanced study of literature. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 2220 Introduction to Short Fiction — 4 credits

This course explores short fiction through short stories and tales. Varying topics include Reading Race and Ethnicity, Fairy Tales for Adults, Comic Vision, Women Short Story Writers, and Slices of Life/Striking Revelations. Students will closely investigate literary elements of plot, character, theme, and point of view along with the social significance of literature. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Also offered in Evening/Weekend/Online Program.

ENGL 2230 Introduction to the Novel — 4 credits

An exploration of the novel, this course varies by instructor and semester. Topics may include Novels into Film, Six Degrees of Harry Potter, Oprah Books, Courtship and Marriage, and Lesbian Literature. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 2240 Drama: On the Page and on the Stage — 4 credits

In this course, students will have opportunities to appreciate the power of drama in scripts and live performance. Varying themes include the Family Circle, Social Protest and Reform, Dreamers and Schemers, the Self in Society, and Twin Cities Theater. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Also offered in Evening/Weekend/Online Program.

ENGL 2250 Introduction to Poetry — 4 credits

This course explores the rich language of poetry, offering tools for literary analysis and strategies for reading aloud and in silent contemplation. Readers closely examine poetic forms, deliberately rhythmical speech, figurative language, and poetic traditions. Though some assignments invite the oral and written imitation of poetic forms and metaphors, this is not a course in creative writing. Various themes have included “The Power of Poetry,” “Poetry: A Field Guide” and “Asian-Pacific-American Women’s Poetry.” Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Also offered in Evening/Weekend/Online Program.

ENGL 2260 Literature in Translation — 4 credits

This introductory course takes up the vast, rich, and profound stores of world literature - not written originally in English. Varying by semester and instructor, this course raises key questions of literature, geography and culture. Topics have included the Bible as Literature, Asian Literature, and Poetics & Politics of Translation. Students debate issues of universality and uniqueness in expression and culture. Offered occasionally. This class meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature.

ENGL 2270W Global Shakespeare — 4 credits

Discover Shakespeare through close reading and discussion of his sonnets and plays within an international context. Explore performance criticism by global authors from diverse cultural backgrounds and experience adaptations of Shakespeare's plays on stage or screen. Form a critical perspective on Shakespeare as a global cultural phenomenon and as a site of resistance for authors and thespians of color, and understand "the Bard" from his incarnation in Elizabethan England through his transformations and translations in the 21st century. Offered annually. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation, and it also meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 2280 Introduction to Literary Themes — 4 credits

Examine the cultural and historical themes of imaginative texts across multiple literary genres, including short and long fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Varying themes have included the Harlem Renaissance, Irish and Scottish Literature, Women on the Road, Portrayals of Native Americans in Poetry, Literature in Sickness and in Health, and Marriage and Family Relationships. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature.

ENGL 2290W Women and Literature — 4 credits

This course focuses on the ways which women's identities, world views, roles, and relationships emerge in literary works written by both women and men. Varying themes include International Black Women Writers, Mothers and Daughters, Women, Men and Marriage, Fictional Female Detectives, Female Heroes, Lesbian Texts in Contexts, Black Women’s Personal Narratives, and Scarlet Women. Credit may be earned under this course number more than once for different emphases. Also offered as WOST 2290W. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation, and it also meets the liberal arts core requirements in both literature and Women’s Studies. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 2305W Writing for Life: Developing Skill and Confidence — 4 credits

Designed to develop writing skills that will prove useful for a lifetime, this class will help students to discover their voice, generate and organize their ideas, explore the role of audience and purpose, navigate their way through grammar and mechanics basics, edit for clarity and hone their research skills. From invention to revision, the writing process is the focus here. Students will read the works of accomplished writers to discover the secrets of their success, share their writing with peers in small groups and meet with their instructor in individual conferences. Skills learned in the class will enhance academic performance and career development. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

ENGL 2310 Introduction to Creative Writing — 4 credits

This course allows students to explore realms of imaginative writing. Students will produce poems and stories along with other genres, including possibly plays, memoirs, experimental intermixing, and cross-overs. As the first course of the creative writing sequence, students will try out a number of styles, forms and approaches to language and gain exposure to a broad range of creative work. Offered every semester. This course does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature, nor, while writing intensive, does this course fulfill a writing intensive requirement. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

ENGL 2340 Writing as a Career — 4 credits

Positions with magazines, businesses, the media, and websites are common career options for writers. Professional writing requires a unique set of skills that builds upon, but is not the same as, other types of writing expertise such as academic writing, poetry and fiction writing and memoir. In this course, students will learn how to develop topics into thoughtful, creative and marketable works. Students will hone their skills in areas like in-depth interviewing, background research and editing. Students will gain skills in promotional communication and build their sense of audience and technical writing. Most importantly, students will practice, discuss and receive feedback on the specific type of writing they will do as a professional writer. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 2350 Rhetorical Grammar — 4 credits

This course focuses on the grammar of standard written English from the rhetorical perspective; that is, how the topic, purpose and audience affect the writer's grammatical and stylistic choices. In addition, the socio-cultural significance of grammatical usage in U.S. society, and issues and concerns that surround the teaching of grammar are addressed. Appropriate for education majors and students who wish to strengthen their grammar skills. This class does not count as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. It does not fulfill the liberal arts literature requirement. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

ENGL 2450W Language in Society — 4 credits

This course examines language as it is used in everyday interaction rather than in a textbook. Everyone uses language to express who they are and to discover who others are. In doing so, they may notice that people speak differently. Students will examine those differences and what they seem to mean; that is, the focus on the relationships between language use and the social structures in which they live – communities and educational institutions, to name but two. As part of this focus, students will look at how language variation relates to social characteristics such as gender, ethnic identity and social class and how social factors mold their attitudes toward other languages and other dialects (Ebonics, ASL, e.g.). Also offered as WOST 2450W. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. It does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

ENGL 2480 History and Structure of English — 4 credits

This course focuses on the structure of the English language in its many varieties and explores how the language has changed over time. Students will study the sounds of the language, the ways English words are constructed and the structure of English phrases and sentences. Students will also examine the social, technological and economic factors that have shaped English. Finally, students will explore the current status of English as a global language and look at the forms it takes throughout the world. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 2500 The Short Story — 2 credits

This writing-based literature course introduces you to the skill of reading and writing short stories. You will read and analyze written work by emerging, established and renowned authors. You will also experiment with your own short story writing to facilitate learning about the varying techniques for writing effective short stories. Both reading and writing activities focus on the intentional use of style and language in short stories. Offered in the College for Adults.

ENGL 2560 Introduction To Literary Themes — 4 credits

This introductory course teaches the thematic interpretation of imaginative texts across multiple literary genres, including short and long fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama. Students will compare readings to discover meanings in literary, cultural and historical contexts. Themes vary according to instructors' choices but may include the following: the Harlem Renaissance, Irish and Scottish Literature, Women on the Road, Portrayals of Native Americans in Poetry, Fiction, and Film, and Literature in Sickness and in Health. Students may earn credit under this course number more than once for varied emphases. Also offered in Weekend College. Meets the liberal arts core requirement in literature.

ENGL 2683 Directed Study — 3 credits

ENGL 2982 Topics In Literature — 2 credits

The subject matter of this course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. All topics courses are writing-based literature courses. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses. Possible topics include Culture and Film, World Literature, Contemporary Poetry and Folklore.

ENGL 2994 Topics — 4 credits

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies but does not duplicate existing courses. Some sections meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 3254 British Writers I — 4 credits

Designed primarily for English majors and minors, this course focuses on The Great Tradition: the most influential writers and themes of British literature before 1800. Topics may include Legends of King Arthur; Life in Hell and Heaven; Queen Elizabeth's Courtiers; Medieval Women as Mistresses, Mystics, and Lusty Widows; Royal Women of the Renaissance Stage; Shakespeare’s Contemporary Poets and Playwrights; Revolutionary Fantasies of Self Discovery. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2200 or equivalent.

ENGL 3255 British Writers II — 4 credits

Designed primarily for English majors and minors, this course focuses on selected literary works of 19th and 20th Century authors who were profoundly affected by and who helped shape the Romantic, Victorian and Modern periods, turbulent times of dramatic change. Topics include Mind Questers and Nature Worshippers; Women’s Voice and Struggle; Gothic Castles and Domestic Drama; Romance, Realism and Reform; Rebels and Conformers in times of Creative Chaos. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2200 or equivalent.

ENGL 3260 Literary Movements and Eras — 4 credits

Aimed at confident readers, this course captures the spirit of a selected literary era or movement by comparing texts within their social contexts. Readings usually cross literary genres to include short and long fiction, private and public essays, drama, poetry, letters, and popular song. Selected topics may include Chaucer and His Contemporaries, the English Renaissance from Henry VIII through Elizabeth I, American Romanticism, British Romanticism, the Irish Renaissance, the American Civil Rights Movement, or Current Literature of Dissent. You may earn credit under this course number more than once for varied emphases. Offered occasionally.

ENGL 3265 Global Writers in English — 4 credits

Aimed at English majors and minors, this course surveys literature written in English from around the world. This class offers exposure to the poetry, drama and fiction of authors from such locales as Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Ireland, Canada, Australia, and India. Much care is taken to make connections between this work and counterparts in Great Britain and the United States. Key topics include Empire and Post-Colonialism, Literary Nationalism and Women Writers. Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2200 or equivalent.

ENGL 3274 American Writers I — 4 credits

This course explores origins and ideas of early American literature - discovery through the period commonly known as the American Renaissance. After a brief look at the literature of the 15th through the 18th centuries, the course concentrates on major rebels, romantics and realists of the 19th century and their preoccupations with such issues as the individual and American identity, freedom and slavery, the role of women, immigration and cultural diversity, nature, and industrialization. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2200 or equivalent.

ENGL 3275 American Writers II — 4 credits

This course charts the loss of romanticism, the emergence of the Lost Generation, and the creation of modernism and postmodernism in 20th and 21st century American literature. This literature reflects the impact of technology, world wars, social change movements, and prosperity on individuals and communities, on cultural values and on the American dream. Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2200 or equivalent.

ENGL 3300 Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry — 4 credits

This poetry workshop course continues the investigation of sources for creativity and furthers the practice and understanding of both traditional and experimental patterns of poetry. Emphasis is on affirming a strong individual voice while expanding students' ability to express themself through prosodic forms. Students immerse themself in poetry through reading, discussing and attending live performances of poetry. Revision becomes an urgent and imaginative activity. Fulfills neither the liberal arts core requirement in literature nor a writing intensive requirement. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2310 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 3310 Intermediate Creative Writing - Fiction — 4 credits

This workshop course continues the investigation of sources for creativity and furthers the practice and understanding of both traditional and experimental patterns of fiction. Whether students are working on short stories or a longer imaginative piece such as a novel, they'll be helped through all the phases of creating a successful work of fiction, from idea to final draft. The intention of the class is to motivate and inspire students in the art of self-expression, not just "show," and to welcome them into a community of writers. Students will find an emphasis on the affirmation of a strong individual voice and style and the rediscovery of their own innate creativity. Students will read current fiction, workshop one another's fiction, and attend live performances. Offered annually. Does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2310 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 3330 Creative Nonfiction — 4 credits

In this class, students will explore the vast and evolving world of creative nonfiction as they create literature from the real events of their life and the world around them. Students will engage analysis and reflection, memory and meditation, humor and healing as they write their own nonfiction works. Students' work for this class may include personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, travel writing, cultural criticism, and more. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.

ENGL 3340 Writing for the Digital Age: Compelling Content for Blogs, Websites and Social Media — 4 credits

This course focuses on the forms, principles, and ethics of journalistic writing. In the process of reading and writing news stories, feature articles, profiles, opinion/editorial pieces and reviews, students will learn the differences between journalistic and academic writing, the range of forms published in the print media, and the ethical considerations involved in researching, interviewing and writing for newspapers and magazines. Offered occasionally. Does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2305W or equivalent.

ENGL 3360W Intermediate Writing: Writing with Power, Purpose and the Perfect Word — 4 credits

This class will enhance, enrich and refine writing skills that will serve students throughout their college years and into the professional world. Students will develop strategies for expressing themselves powerfully and with purpose and come to believe that every word chosen is an important and critical decision for a writer. The class will study poetry for its economy of words and newsletter composition to develop communication skills that will transfer to work opportunities after graduation. Students will gain experience in writing and designing their own newsletters and work with experienced writers from the greater community. Essays written by professionals will inspire critical thinking and analytical abilities and provide models for students as they experiment with different writing genres. Creative small group activities and inspiring guest speakers will add variety to the learning. This class counts as one of the four writing intensive courses required for graduation. Offered in the College for Women.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2305W or equivalent.

ENGL 3400W Language as Power — 4 credits

This class will take students into the complex and often hidden intersections of language and power, focusing on the many ways in which language serves as a tool of power. It will examine how people negotiate power on several levels, both individually and socially; how words imply more than they say (and thus can be used to manipulate); how language policies in education and other societal institutions privilege some groups while oppressing others; and how oppressed groups use language to resist their oppression. Because language is so intimately tied to the communities that use it, we will examine language use through the lenses of race/ethnicity and gender among others. Also offered in Weekend Program. Also offered as CRST 3401W and WOST 3400W. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. Does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults. Not open to first year students.

ENGL 3450 Introduction to Linguistics — 4 credits

This class will introduce students to the scientific study of language. Students will learn how languages are structured, how they express meaning, how they are learned, and how they change over time. The class will examine the sound systems of languages, the ways they construct words, and how they put words together into phrases and sentences. Using English as a basis, the course will explore the vast variety of the world's languages. Not open to first-year students. Offered in the College for Women.

ENGL 3490 Topics in Language Studies — 4 credits

The subject matter of this course varies. Topics may include: World Englishes; Linguistic Human Rights; Teaching English as a Second Language; Language, Race and Ethnicity; and Critical Discourse Analysis. Offered in alternate years. Offered in the College for Women. Also offered as CRST 3490.

ENGL 4300 Advanced Writing: Cultivating Your Style — 4 credits

This course, the capstone of the expository writing sequence, emphasizes the development of an individual sense of style and effective use of language that will distinguish students as an experienced and accomplished writer. Students will be encouraged to experiment with subject, voice and approach in a series of essays that demand a unique and personal approach. There is a strong connection between skills perfected in this class and their practical application in the professional world, and students may have an opportunity to try their hand at writing for publication or to create and implement a newsletter of their own design and content. Peer review and a team approach remain essentials of this useful and empowering class.
Prerequisite: ENGL 3360W or permission of instructor.

ENGL 4310 Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing — 4 credits

The culminating step in the creative writing sequence, this workshop course is focused on the production of a polished body of work: fiction, poetry, drama, or creative nonfiction-memoir. In addition to participating in writing workshops and meeting writers from the Twin Cities community, students will be exposed to an array of publication venues — quarterlies, journals — where they might consider submitting their work for publication. Offered only occasionally, the course does not meet the liberal arts core requirement in literature, nor can intensive writing credit be earned.
Prerequisites: Two courses in creative writing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 4320W The Editorial Process — 4 credits

In this course, students work on bringing their editorial skills and their confidence in those skills up to a level that permits them to take advantage of the many jobs available for people with an excellent command of written - and spoken - English. After an intensive evaluation of their own writing quality up to this point, students undertake a thorough review of grammar, punctuation and writing technique. Students experience hands-on editing practice. Offered annually. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: ENGL 2305W or equivalent or permission of instructor.

ENGL 4602 Internship — 2 credits

This course is a structured out-of-class learning experience that takes place on or off campus and includes a substantial work component. An internship involves students in a venue to explore career interests and potential. To initiate an internship experience, meet with the internship coordinator in the Career Development Office.
Prerequisites: Faculty sponsorship and approval by department chair.

ENGL 4604 Internship — 4 credits

This course is a structured out-of-class learning experience that takes place on or off campus and includes a substantial work component. An internship involves you in a venue to explore career interests and potential. To initiate an internship experience, meet with the internship coordinator in the Career Development Office.
Prerequisites: Faculty sponsorship and approval by department chair.

ENGL 4684 Directed Study — 4 credits

Directed study is provided for students whose unusual circumstances prohibit taking a regularly scheduled course but who need the material of that course to satisfy a requirement. Availability of this faculty-directed learning experience depends on faculty time and may be limited in any given term and restricted to certain courses.
Prerequisites: Faculty, department chair and dean approval.

ENGL 4860W Seminar — 4 credits

Together as a community of learners/scholars, students engage in concentrated, in-depth study of reading, writing or language. Building on skills and knowledge cultivated in English 2200 and other courses in the major, students' study will mature in a seminar format, involving students in collaborative reading and research, in leading discussions, and ultimately in producing a substantial critical essay related to the seminar focus. Preference is given to senior English majors but juniors may register if the class limit of 12 permits. Offered every semester. This class counts as one of the four Writing Intensive courses required for graduation. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

ENGL 4952 Independent Study — 2 credits

For students wishing intensive or advanced work in literature under the direction of faculty specialists.
Prerequisites: Faculty and department chair permission.

ENGL 4954 Independent Study — 4 credits

For students wishing intensive or advanced work in literature under the direction of faculty specialists.
Prerequisites: Faculty and department chair permission.

ENGL 4994 Topics — 4 credits

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies but does not duplicate existing courses. Offered in the College for Women and the College for Adults.